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News

With so much going on in our homes, it can be difficult to keep up! That’s why we regularly update this news page with our latest goings-on at Wellbeing Care in Oulton Broad, Beccles and Irchester so you can check back and find out what we’ve been up to.

Follow us on Facebook and Twitter too to be the first to know about all sorts, including our upcoming events, activities, birthday celebrations and team news.

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How to Make Friends in Retirement: Our Guide to Combatting Loneliness

Are you heading into retirement?



When you leave the world of work, you may wonder how it will affect your social life.



Workplaces are ideal for meeting new people and making new friends. Whether it’s breaking the ice with a new colleague or chatting to a client, there are many opportunities to socialise each day.



When you stop working, you may find you have fewer opportunities to interact with others.



Here, we’re looking at how to make friends in retirement:



How to Make Friends in Retirement: Stay in Touch



If your job involved regularly speaking to customers, or you were immersed in a bustling office, you’ll likely be used to spending time with others.



When you retire, it's natural to feel anxious about being disconnected from your friendship group at work; but there's no reason for your dynamic to change too drastically.



Before you leave, consider how you could stay in touch with your colleagues. You may decide that you want to continue on a part-time basis, or that you would just like to be a part of social events moving forward.



Why not arrange to meet them outside of working hours too? You could organise drinks one evening, or invite them out for lunch at the weekend.



Consider Volunteering



Volunteering is a great way to keep busy and stay connected within your community during retirement.



Having the chance to work alongside others will provide you with ample opportunities for making new friends. To strengthen your new friendships, why not invite a few of your co-workers out for dinner?



How to Make Friends in Retirement: Take Up a Hobby



Starting a new hobby can help you meet other like-minded people with similar interests. There are plenty of hobbies you could try; you could join a knitting group, a book club or a walking group, to name a few.



You could consider starting your own group. If you don’t have social media, why not consider setting up an account? You could join Facebook or Instagram, both platforms where you can share photos and updates about your life, and connect with others who do the same.



As well as connecting with your friends and family, you could use this as an opportunity to stay in touch with those who share your hobbies and interests.



Friendships are an important part of life - and as we get older, it becomes even more important to make these connections. Building relationships with others can help to avoid loneliness, whilst also providing you with a strong support network. Socialising, too, helps to further improve cognitive skills, such as memory.



If you’ve found our guide on how to make friends in retirement helpful, why not read our previous blog on community acts to boost camaraderie?



Alternatively, for more information about our care services, please contact a dedicated member of our team.

19th October

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Gardening Tips for Seniors | Making the Most of Your Garden

Are you looking to transform your garden?



No matter what size your outdoor space is, it should be seen as an extension of your home. This week, we’re sharing our gardening tips for seniors to help you transform your garden into a haven.



Gardening Tips for Seniors: Use Garden Mirrors



Mirrors may seem like an unconventional choice of decor for a garden, but when placed mindfully they reflect the space and the light, creating a feeling of openness and making your garden seem larger than it really is.



Carefully placed mirrors can not only create the feeling of a larger outdoor space, but they can also add a unique aesthetic. Why not scour some charity shops to find a large, vintage mirror and create a ‘secret garden’ shabby chic look?



Use Lights to Brighten Up Your Outdoor Space



Solar panelled lights in your flower borders, fairy lights adorning fences and trees, and even garden candles can all contribute to a cosy, relaxed atmosphere, as well as providing much-needed light for your evenings.



You could combine light and warmth with heated lamps, or use a fire pit to help keep you warm and allow you to continue enjoying your garden in the colder months.



Create a Wildflower Area



Wildflowers are a beautiful addition to your garden; the vibrant colours and mismatched flowers create a stunning visual.



They also attract bees and butterflies, so you’ll be doing your bit for the environment whilst enjoying spotting the various insects in your garden.



You could turn your garden borders into a wildflower haven, perhaps on raised beds. These can have a pleasing aesthetic effect, and also reduce the pressure on your back as you tend to them.



Gardening Tips for Seniors: Reuse and Upcycle



From old watering cans to empty jam jars, there are many different everyday items you can transform into pretty adornments for your garden.



You could fill empty jars with solar panelled fairy lights to add a unique twist to your outdoor table, or you could use old watering cans to grow flowers and hang them from your fence.



Old pallets can be transformed into garden furniture, bug hotels, or even a mud kitchen for children and grandchildren. It can be rewarding to capture photos of the progress of your garden transformation and to then take photos of your loved ones enjoying your new garden space once it’s finished.



Use Outdoor Blankets, Cushions and Beanbags



Your garden should be an inviting, relaxing space for you to unwind in; whether it’s alone with a cup of tea after a long day, or with friends for food and drinks.



One of our gardening tips for seniors is having an assortment of outdoor blankets, cushions and beanbags available to encourage you and your guests to make yourself comfortable and settle down for the evening.



A hammock is also a charming idea if you have the space, as this can encourage you to spend more time in the garden. It’ll provide you with a comfortable space for stargazing, bird watching, or even just reading a book.



You may also want to invest in a canopy to provide you with some shelter, so you can continue enjoying your garden even if the weather turns.



A well-designed and considered garden can offer sanctuary from the hustle and bustle of everyday life, particularly throughout your retirement years. Spending time outdoors can help keep you healthy as you get older and improve your overall health and wellbeing, as it can encourage you to move more as you potter around, and increase your sun exposure to help keep your Vitamin D topped up.



For more ways to stay healthy in your senior years, why not read our previous article on healthy breakfast ideas?



Alternatively, to find out more about our care services, please contact a member of our team.

5th October

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Our New Care Home Manager: Meet Claire

Have you met our new care home manager?



We’re delighted to announce the appointment of our newest staff member, Claire. She has joined our team here at The Dell as our new service manager.



Here at The Dell, we provide residential, dementia and respite care for up to 40 people. We offer both day care and supported living services, and pride ourselves on providing the highest levels of care for our many wonderful clients.



Delivering high-quality care is our top priority, and so our hiring system is fine-tuned to ensure we only take on the very best team members. With this in mind, Claire was the ideal candidate for the role.



About Our New Care Home Manager, Claire



Claire has accumulated a wealth of experience since starting her career in care back in 2005. She has previously worked in managerial positions at multiple care homes and hopes to utilise her caring nature and experience to take our home from strength to strength, helping us to continue delivering high quality and person-centred care.



From working throughout the COVID-19 pandemic and experiencing first-hand the difficulties caused by staff shortages and isolation, Claire hopes to ensure continued best practices in our care delivery post-pandemic.



Claire Discusses Her New Role With Us Here at The Dell



Discussing her new role with us here at The Dell, Claire said: “I’m delighted to be a part of the Wellbeing Care team. So far, my opinion is that it is a wonderful place to work - everyone is friendly, warm and caring. Empathetic and dedicated too, the team certainly contributes to The Dell’s homely environment.”



“My favourite part of the job is connecting and engaging with relatives and their families. That is, ultimately, what working in care is all about. I worked in hospitality for years before care. However, I knew when I ventured into care-providing services that I had found my passion. I like to help others and am glad to have found a career that enables me to do so,” Claire continued.



When asked what makes a great team leader, Claire told us, “Being understanding and fair. It’s also about ascertaining responsibility within your role as, by working in a care setting, people rely on you. You are in an important position of trust.”



Moving Forward With Our Newly Appointed Care Home Manager



Farooq Patel, our director here at Wellbeing Care, added “We are over the moon to welcome Claire to our compassionate team of staff. With her strong will, visionary outlook and warm demeanour, we believe her insights – formulated after decades of experience in the healthcare sector – to be invaluable here at Wellbeing Care. She will no doubt be an asset to the team as we continue to build upon and develop the skills of staff and health-providing services post-COVID-19.”



We’re excited for Claire to integrate herself into the home and share her wealth of knowledge, experience and expertise to enable us to continue bettering the already high standard of care we uphold.



If you’d like to know more about our Wellbeing Care services, please contact a member of our team.



Alternatively, to find out how we’re dedicated to improving our services, why not read our previous blog on our training with the Dementia Dictionary?

4th October

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5 Healthy Breakfast Ideas for Seniors | Wellbeing Care

Keen to discover some inspiration for breakfast ideas for seniors?



Breakfast is an important meal as it helps to set you in good stead for the day. Having a fresh, healthy breakfast can help to boost your energy levels and maximise your cognitive abilities.



From avocado on toast to wholesome porridge, we’re taking a look at our top 5 healthy breakfast ideas for seniors:



Breakfast Ideas for Seniors: Poached Eggs and Avocado on Toast



Avocado is a fantastic source of fibre and is packed full of nutrients. The low-carb fruit is also high in ‘monounsaturated fats’, which are essential for maintaining good cholesterol levels. Avocado is classed as a superfood, and is incredibly versatile.



Why not try crushed avocado on seeded, multigrain bread for a healthy breakfast dish? You could add chilli flakes and lime juice for a zingy start to your day.



Poached eggs are full of protein and are a great addition to your avocado on toast; you could even add a handful of spinach or mushrooms for an extra boost of goodness. Why not try a gentle workout, too, for the ultimate health kick?



Fruit Salad With Natural Yoghurt



Fruits are full of vitamins and minerals, making them an ideal breakfast option. They’re versatile, too, so you can adapt them in almost any way you like.



You could try a tropical fruit salad by dicing mango, kiwi, bananas and pineapple, and then balancing the acidity with a generous spoonful of protein-rich natural yoghurt. Given their high nutritional value, fruits can help to improve your heart health, cognitive function, muscle and bone health and boost your immune system.



We recommend adding pomegranate seeds to your morning fruit salad for an extra burst of delicious goodness. The sweet seeds add not only a bright colour to your dish, but they’re also loaded with antioxidants and vitamins, which helps your body by reducing your blood pressure and improving your heart health.



Breakfast Ideas for Seniors: Overnight Oats With Your Choice of Toppings



Overnight oats are a popular healthy breakfast dish; they’re easy to prepare, delicious and packed full of goodness. You’ll enjoy a lasting feeling of fullness, too, since the high fibre content of oats stimulates the release of slow-releasing energy when consumed.



To make overnight oats, simply spoon some oats into a jar (usually 1/2 cup of oats per portion), and soak them overnight in the fridge with ½ cup of milk and/or natural yoghurt. You could mix in a spoonful of peanut butter, too, or a cup of berries to enhance the flavour and nutritional content.



The following morning, remove your oats from the fridge and finish with your choice of toppings. Why not try a drizzle of honey and a handful of mixed berries for a healthy sweet treat?



Here is an easy recipe for delicious overnight oats.



Breakfast Ideas for Seniors: Smoothie Bowls



Smoothie bowls are as simple as they sound: simply whizz up a smoothie, but serve it in a bowl with toppings of your choice! Smoothie bowls do tend to be a little thicker in consistency, though, so be sure to add enough thickening agents so that you can easily eat it with a spoon. Yoghurts and frozen bananas are great thickeners, and provide an extra bit of flavour, too.



We like this spinach and avocado smoothie bowl, which is packed full of vitamins and antioxidants.



You can top with toasted granola, berries and chia seeds to increase your fibre intake and add a little more substance.



Breakfast Ideas for Seniors: Simple Porridge



Porridge is an easy and delicious way to start your day. It’s light enough to leave you feeling comfortable, whilst being filling enough to keep your hunger at bay until lunchtime.



Simply add a ½ cup of oats to 1 cup of milk, and stir over a low/medium heat until it thickens. To serve, you could add a drizzle of honey or a dollop of jam to sweeten it slightly, or you could add berries or banana to change up the texture and flavour.



As porridge oats are a complex carbohydrate, they release energy slowly to help you get through the morning.



At Wellbeing Care, we’re passionate about ensuring our residents enjoy healthy, wholesome diets. If you’d like to know more about our services, please contact a member of our team.



Alternatively, if you’ve enjoyed reading about our healthy breakfast ideas for seniors, why not read our previous blog on hydration and nutrition?

2nd September

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The Importance of Taking Photos and How to Make the Most of Them

This week, we’re looking at the importance of taking photos, and how you can make the most of them.



From scrapbooking to storytelling, photos are wonderful keepsakes of the memories made by you and your loved ones.



Here at Wellbeing Care, we’re looking at the importance of taking photos:



What is the Importance of Taking Photos?



Taking photos is important for preserving the memories made with your loved ones. Photographs can be set-up to mark an important occasion, or candid as you capture a special moment in time.



You may take photos of houses you’ve lived in, places you’ve visited, people you’ve just met and people you love.



As you get older, you realise that sometimes people move away, move on, or even pass away - and often, photographs can provide comfort in these difficult times.



Here at Wellbeing Care, we take plenty of photos; they serve as wonderful keepsakes for our residents and their families. Check out our social media to take a look.



The Importance of Taking Photos: How Can You Make the Most of Your Photos?



You may want to make multiple copies of your favourite photos, so you can share them with your friends and family. You could also have some framed, or slotted into precious family photo albums.



Having photographs of your loved ones around the home can help make a house feel more homely - and will put a smile on your face every time you walk past them.



It’s important for our residents to have their precious memories dotted around our care homes, as this can help them to feel more comfortable and at ease - particularly if they’re new or are living with dementia.



The Importance of Taking Photos: Why are Photo Albums Beneficial?



Pulling out old photo albums and going through them can be a wonderful activity to enjoy alone or with loved ones; it gives you the opportunity to be instantly transported back to that time.



For our residents living with dementia, this can help to hone their memory and induce feelings of happiness and nostalgia. Sharing this experience with others can be special, too - and within a care home setting, it can be a wonderful opportunity for residents to offer insight into their lives.



The Importance of Taking Photos: How Can Scrapbooking Help Those Living With Dementia?



Scrapbooking is a great way to get our residents’ creative juices flowing. It also helps to improve their motor skills as they cut and stick photos, before writing captions for each memory. It can also encourage storytelling as they explain the relevance of each photo.



As time passes, the scrapbook will serve as a treasure that offers wonderful memories to savour, and can eventually be passed onto family members.



So, remember to continue taking photos - and then frame them, share them, or scrapbook them.



If your loved one is living with dementia, why not read our previous blog on the effects of Sundowners Syndrome?



Alternatively, please contact a member of our team for more information about our Wellbeing Care services.

26th August

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What is Sundowners Syndrome? | Exploring the Effects of Sundowning

Do you find that your loved one who is living with dementia often deteriorates towards the end of the day?



They may be experiencing ‘sundowning’ - a term coined to describe the effects of a person living with dementia as the sun sets and evening draws in.



Here at Wellbeing Care, we’re exploring the possible causes and symptoms as we ask the question, ‘what is Sundowners Syndrome?’



What is Sundowners Syndrome?



The term sundowning describes how a person living with dementia often becomes increasingly more irritable as the day progresses. They may begin to find conversations or tasks more difficult, and their behaviours may begin to regress as their mood deteriorates.



This can be particularly worrisome for family members, particularly if there have been signs of improvement or cognitive stability earlier in the day. The concept of Sundowner Syndrome relates to the idea that tiredness can creep in and affect the person living with dementia drastically.



Many people find that as they near their bedtime, they may not function quite so well. Their body and brain are entering a shutdown state ready for slumber, and so their cognitive abilities become less sharp. This is a perfectly normal response to our bodies preparing for rest and is caused by a reduction in dopamine levels and an increase in melatonin production, but it can have a heavier and more negative effect on someone who is living with dementia.



This is because their bodies don’t produce as much melatonin, leading to disrupted sleep patterns and restlessness. Also, because their cognitive capabilities are already in decline and they’re already a bit hazy, the period where their brains then start to shut down for bed can be far more noticeable and, often, distressing. They’re already in a state of confusion, and so tiredness can amplify this and cause them to perhaps become more forgetful and misbehave or lash out.



How to Reduce the Effects of Sundowners Syndrome



Whilst this is an unpleasant situation for the person living with dementia and their loved ones, there are some helpful tools to help reduce the effects, and limit the period they go on for. We do recommend that you also speak to your loved one’s healthcare provider for further advice and treatment options to help ease the sundowning effects.



Try to reduce or omit their caffeine intake. Caffeine is a brain stimulant and can affect the body’s internal body clock. Switching to decaffeinated drinks or herbal teas can help to regulate their sleep patterns and help them feel calm before bed.



A consistent sleep routine is essential; try to keep a set time for bed and waking up, so they’re not out of sync each day. The same applies to napping, but this can be a difficult balance to strike. The person living with dementia should nap if they feel tired, as overtiredness can lead to irritability. However, over napping can then interrupt their sleep at bedtime, and so finding a napping schedule that works for them is key.



A comfortable room can help them to feel relaxed. Try to use neutral tones in the bedroom to prevent them from feeling stimulated at nighttime.



Try to keep their daily routine as consistent and simple as possible to help with familiarity and comfort. However, they should also be encouraged to increase their daily exercise and activity levels, as this can promote a need for sleep.



If your loved one is living with dementia and you’re experiencing sundowning, please feel free to contact a member of our team. We’ve had extensive dementia training and would be happy to help you in any way we can. We can also help you explore our care service options.



Alternatively, you may find our previous blog on dementia communication helpful.

19th August

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How to Make Friends in Retirement: Our Guide to Combatting Loneliness

Are you heading into retirement?



When you leave the world of work, you may wonder how it will affect your social life.



Workplaces are ideal for meeting new people and making new friends. Whether it’s breaking the ice with a new colleague or chatting to a client, there are many opportunities to socialise each day.



When you stop working, you may find you have fewer opportunities to interact with others.



Here, we’re looking at how to make friends in retirement:



How to Make Friends in Retirement: Stay in Touch



If your job involved regularly speaking to customers, or you were immersed in a bustling office, you’ll likely be used to spending time with others.



When you retire, it's natural to feel anxious about being disconnected from your friendship group at work; but there's no reason for your dynamic to change too drastically.



Before you leave, consider how you could stay in touch with your colleagues. You may decide that you want to continue on a part-time basis, or that you would just like to be a part of social events moving forward.



Why not arrange to meet them outside of working hours too? You could organise drinks one evening, or invite them out for lunch at the weekend.



Consider Volunteering



Volunteering is a great way to keep busy and stay connected within your community during retirement.



Having the chance to work alongside others will provide you with ample opportunities for making new friends. To strengthen your new friendships, why not invite a few of your co-workers out for dinner?



How to Make Friends in Retirement: Take Up a Hobby



Starting a new hobby can help you meet other like-minded people with similar interests. There are plenty of hobbies you could try; you could join a knitting group, a book club or a walking group, to name a few.



You could consider starting your own group. If you don’t have social media, why not consider setting up an account? You could join Facebook or Instagram, both platforms where you can share photos and updates about your life, and connect with others who do the same.



As well as connecting with your friends and family, you could use this as an opportunity to stay in touch with those who share your hobbies and interests.



Friendships are an important part of life - and as we get older, it becomes even more important to make these connections. Building relationships with others can help to avoid loneliness, whilst also providing you with a strong support network. Socialising, too, helps to further improve cognitive skills, such as memory.



If you’ve found our guide on how to make friends in retirement helpful, why not read our previous blog on community acts to boost camaraderie?



Alternatively, for more information about our care services, please contact a dedicated member of our team.

19th October

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Gardening Tips for Seniors | Making the Most of Your Garden

Are you looking to transform your garden?



No matter what size your outdoor space is, it should be seen as an extension of your home. This week, we’re sharing our gardening tips for seniors to help you transform your garden into a haven.



Gardening Tips for Seniors: Use Garden Mirrors



Mirrors may seem like an unconventional choice of decor for a garden, but when placed mindfully they reflect the space and the light, creating a feeling of openness and making your garden seem larger than it really is.



Carefully placed mirrors can not only create the feeling of a larger outdoor space, but they can also add a unique aesthetic. Why not scour some charity shops to find a large, vintage mirror and create a ‘secret garden’ shabby chic look?



Use Lights to Brighten Up Your Outdoor Space



Solar panelled lights in your flower borders, fairy lights adorning fences and trees, and even garden candles can all contribute to a cosy, relaxed atmosphere, as well as providing much-needed light for your evenings.



You could combine light and warmth with heated lamps, or use a fire pit to help keep you warm and allow you to continue enjoying your garden in the colder months.



Create a Wildflower Area



Wildflowers are a beautiful addition to your garden; the vibrant colours and mismatched flowers create a stunning visual.



They also attract bees and butterflies, so you’ll be doing your bit for the environment whilst enjoying spotting the various insects in your garden.



You could turn your garden borders into a wildflower haven, perhaps on raised beds. These can have a pleasing aesthetic effect, and also reduce the pressure on your back as you tend to them.



Gardening Tips for Seniors: Reuse and Upcycle



From old watering cans to empty jam jars, there are many different everyday items you can transform into pretty adornments for your garden.



You could fill empty jars with solar panelled fairy lights to add a unique twist to your outdoor table, or you could use old watering cans to grow flowers and hang them from your fence.



Old pallets can be transformed into garden furniture, bug hotels, or even a mud kitchen for children and grandchildren. It can be rewarding to capture photos of the progress of your garden transformation and to then take photos of your loved ones enjoying your new garden space once it’s finished.



Use Outdoor Blankets, Cushions and Beanbags



Your garden should be an inviting, relaxing space for you to unwind in; whether it’s alone with a cup of tea after a long day, or with friends for food and drinks.



One of our gardening tips for seniors is having an assortment of outdoor blankets, cushions and beanbags available to encourage you and your guests to make yourself comfortable and settle down for the evening.



A hammock is also a charming idea if you have the space, as this can encourage you to spend more time in the garden. It’ll provide you with a comfortable space for stargazing, bird watching, or even just reading a book.



You may also want to invest in a canopy to provide you with some shelter, so you can continue enjoying your garden even if the weather turns.



A well-designed and considered garden can offer sanctuary from the hustle and bustle of everyday life, particularly throughout your retirement years. Spending time outdoors can help keep you healthy as you get older and improve your overall health and wellbeing, as it can encourage you to move more as you potter around, and increase your sun exposure to help keep your Vitamin D topped up.



For more ways to stay healthy in your senior years, why not read our previous article on healthy breakfast ideas?



Alternatively, to find out more about our care services, please contact a member of our team.

5th October

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Our New Care Home Manager: Meet Claire

Have you met our new care home manager?



We’re delighted to announce the appointment of our newest staff member, Claire. She has joined our team here at The Dell as our new service manager.



Here at The Dell, we provide residential, dementia and respite care for up to 40 people. We offer both day care and supported living services, and pride ourselves on providing the highest levels of care for our many wonderful clients.



Delivering high-quality care is our top priority, and so our hiring system is fine-tuned to ensure we only take on the very best team members. With this in mind, Claire was the ideal candidate for the role.



About Our New Care Home Manager, Claire



Claire has accumulated a wealth of experience since starting her career in care back in 2005. She has previously worked in managerial positions at multiple care homes and hopes to utilise her caring nature and experience to take our home from strength to strength, helping us to continue delivering high quality and person-centred care.



From working throughout the COVID-19 pandemic and experiencing first-hand the difficulties caused by staff shortages and isolation, Claire hopes to ensure continued best practices in our care delivery post-pandemic.



Claire Discusses Her New Role With Us Here at The Dell



Discussing her new role with us here at The Dell, Claire said: “I’m delighted to be a part of the Wellbeing Care team. So far, my opinion is that it is a wonderful place to work - everyone is friendly, warm and caring. Empathetic and dedicated too, the team certainly contributes to The Dell’s homely environment.”



“My favourite part of the job is connecting and engaging with relatives and their families. That is, ultimately, what working in care is all about. I worked in hospitality for years before care. However, I knew when I ventured into care-providing services that I had found my passion. I like to help others and am glad to have found a career that enables me to do so,” Claire continued.



When asked what makes a great team leader, Claire told us, “Being understanding and fair. It’s also about ascertaining responsibility within your role as, by working in a care setting, people rely on you. You are in an important position of trust.”



Moving Forward With Our Newly Appointed Care Home Manager



Farooq Patel, our director here at Wellbeing Care, added “We are over the moon to welcome Claire to our compassionate team of staff. With her strong will, visionary outlook and warm demeanour, we believe her insights – formulated after decades of experience in the healthcare sector – to be invaluable here at Wellbeing Care. She will no doubt be an asset to the team as we continue to build upon and develop the skills of staff and health-providing services post-COVID-19.”



We’re excited for Claire to integrate herself into the home and share her wealth of knowledge, experience and expertise to enable us to continue bettering the already high standard of care we uphold.



If you’d like to know more about our Wellbeing Care services, please contact a member of our team.



Alternatively, to find out how we’re dedicated to improving our services, why not read our previous blog on our training with the Dementia Dictionary?

4th October

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5 Healthy Breakfast Ideas for Seniors | Wellbeing Care

Keen to discover some inspiration for breakfast ideas for seniors?



Breakfast is an important meal as it helps to set you in good stead for the day. Having a fresh, healthy breakfast can help to boost your energy levels and maximise your cognitive abilities.



From avocado on toast to wholesome porridge, we’re taking a look at our top 5 healthy breakfast ideas for seniors:



Breakfast Ideas for Seniors: Poached Eggs and Avocado on Toast



Avocado is a fantastic source of fibre and is packed full of nutrients. The low-carb fruit is also high in ‘monounsaturated fats’, which are essential for maintaining good cholesterol levels. Avocado is classed as a superfood, and is incredibly versatile.



Why not try crushed avocado on seeded, multigrain bread for a healthy breakfast dish? You could add chilli flakes and lime juice for a zingy start to your day.



Poached eggs are full of protein and are a great addition to your avocado on toast; you could even add a handful of spinach or mushrooms for an extra boost of goodness. Why not try a gentle workout, too, for the ultimate health kick?



Fruit Salad With Natural Yoghurt



Fruits are full of vitamins and minerals, making them an ideal breakfast option. They’re versatile, too, so you can adapt them in almost any way you like.



You could try a tropical fruit salad by dicing mango, kiwi, bananas and pineapple, and then balancing the acidity with a generous spoonful of protein-rich natural yoghurt. Given their high nutritional value, fruits can help to improve your heart health, cognitive function, muscle and bone health and boost your immune system.



We recommend adding pomegranate seeds to your morning fruit salad for an extra burst of delicious goodness. The sweet seeds add not only a bright colour to your dish, but they’re also loaded with antioxidants and vitamins, which helps your body by reducing your blood pressure and improving your heart health.



Breakfast Ideas for Seniors: Overnight Oats With Your Choice of Toppings



Overnight oats are a popular healthy breakfast dish; they’re easy to prepare, delicious and packed full of goodness. You’ll enjoy a lasting feeling of fullness, too, since the high fibre content of oats stimulates the release of slow-releasing energy when consumed.



To make overnight oats, simply spoon some oats into a jar (usually 1/2 cup of oats per portion), and soak them overnight in the fridge with ½ cup of milk and/or natural yoghurt. You could mix in a spoonful of peanut butter, too, or a cup of berries to enhance the flavour and nutritional content.



The following morning, remove your oats from the fridge and finish with your choice of toppings. Why not try a drizzle of honey and a handful of mixed berries for a healthy sweet treat?



Here is an easy recipe for delicious overnight oats.



Breakfast Ideas for Seniors: Smoothie Bowls



Smoothie bowls are as simple as they sound: simply whizz up a smoothie, but serve it in a bowl with toppings of your choice! Smoothie bowls do tend to be a little thicker in consistency, though, so be sure to add enough thickening agents so that you can easily eat it with a spoon. Yoghurts and frozen bananas are great thickeners, and provide an extra bit of flavour, too.



We like this spinach and avocado smoothie bowl, which is packed full of vitamins and antioxidants.



You can top with toasted granola, berries and chia seeds to increase your fibre intake and add a little more substance.



Breakfast Ideas for Seniors: Simple Porridge



Porridge is an easy and delicious way to start your day. It’s light enough to leave you feeling comfortable, whilst being filling enough to keep your hunger at bay until lunchtime.



Simply add a ½ cup of oats to 1 cup of milk, and stir over a low/medium heat until it thickens. To serve, you could add a drizzle of honey or a dollop of jam to sweeten it slightly, or you could add berries or banana to change up the texture and flavour.



As porridge oats are a complex carbohydrate, they release energy slowly to help you get through the morning.



At Wellbeing Care, we’re passionate about ensuring our residents enjoy healthy, wholesome diets. If you’d like to know more about our services, please contact a member of our team.



Alternatively, if you’ve enjoyed reading about our healthy breakfast ideas for seniors, why not read our previous blog on hydration and nutrition?

2nd September

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The Importance of Taking Photos and How to Make the Most of Them

This week, we’re looking at the importance of taking photos, and how you can make the most of them.



From scrapbooking to storytelling, photos are wonderful keepsakes of the memories made by you and your loved ones.



Here at Wellbeing Care, we’re looking at the importance of taking photos:



What is the Importance of Taking Photos?



Taking photos is important for preserving the memories made with your loved ones. Photographs can be set-up to mark an important occasion, or candid as you capture a special moment in time.



You may take photos of houses you’ve lived in, places you’ve visited, people you’ve just met and people you love.



As you get older, you realise that sometimes people move away, move on, or even pass away - and often, photographs can provide comfort in these difficult times.



Here at Wellbeing Care, we take plenty of photos; they serve as wonderful keepsakes for our residents and their families. Check out our social media to take a look.



The Importance of Taking Photos: How Can You Make the Most of Your Photos?



You may want to make multiple copies of your favourite photos, so you can share them with your friends and family. You could also have some framed, or slotted into precious family photo albums.



Having photographs of your loved ones around the home can help make a house feel more homely - and will put a smile on your face every time you walk past them.



It’s important for our residents to have their precious memories dotted around our care homes, as this can help them to feel more comfortable and at ease - particularly if they’re new or are living with dementia.



The Importance of Taking Photos: Why are Photo Albums Beneficial?



Pulling out old photo albums and going through them can be a wonderful activity to enjoy alone or with loved ones; it gives you the opportunity to be instantly transported back to that time.



For our residents living with dementia, this can help to hone their memory and induce feelings of happiness and nostalgia. Sharing this experience with others can be special, too - and within a care home setting, it can be a wonderful opportunity for residents to offer insight into their lives.



The Importance of Taking Photos: How Can Scrapbooking Help Those Living With Dementia?



Scrapbooking is a great way to get our residents’ creative juices flowing. It also helps to improve their motor skills as they cut and stick photos, before writing captions for each memory. It can also encourage storytelling as they explain the relevance of each photo.



As time passes, the scrapbook will serve as a treasure that offers wonderful memories to savour, and can eventually be passed onto family members.



So, remember to continue taking photos - and then frame them, share them, or scrapbook them.



If your loved one is living with dementia, why not read our previous blog on the effects of Sundowners Syndrome?



Alternatively, please contact a member of our team for more information about our Wellbeing Care services.

26th August

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What is Sundowners Syndrome? | Exploring the Effects of Sundowning

Do you find that your loved one who is living with dementia often deteriorates towards the end of the day?



They may be experiencing ‘sundowning’ - a term coined to describe the effects of a person living with dementia as the sun sets and evening draws in.



Here at Wellbeing Care, we’re exploring the possible causes and symptoms as we ask the question, ‘what is Sundowners Syndrome?’



What is Sundowners Syndrome?



The term sundowning describes how a person living with dementia often becomes increasingly more irritable as the day progresses. They may begin to find conversations or tasks more difficult, and their behaviours may begin to regress as their mood deteriorates.



This can be particularly worrisome for family members, particularly if there have been signs of improvement or cognitive stability earlier in the day. The concept of Sundowner Syndrome relates to the idea that tiredness can creep in and affect the person living with dementia drastically.



Many people find that as they near their bedtime, they may not function quite so well. Their body and brain are entering a shutdown state ready for slumber, and so their cognitive abilities become less sharp. This is a perfectly normal response to our bodies preparing for rest and is caused by a reduction in dopamine levels and an increase in melatonin production, but it can have a heavier and more negative effect on someone who is living with dementia.



This is because their bodies don’t produce as much melatonin, leading to disrupted sleep patterns and restlessness. Also, because their cognitive capabilities are already in decline and they’re already a bit hazy, the period where their brains then start to shut down for bed can be far more noticeable and, often, distressing. They’re already in a state of confusion, and so tiredness can amplify this and cause them to perhaps become more forgetful and misbehave or lash out.



How to Reduce the Effects of Sundowners Syndrome



Whilst this is an unpleasant situation for the person living with dementia and their loved ones, there are some helpful tools to help reduce the effects, and limit the period they go on for. We do recommend that you also speak to your loved one’s healthcare provider for further advice and treatment options to help ease the sundowning effects.



Try to reduce or omit their caffeine intake. Caffeine is a brain stimulant and can affect the body’s internal body clock. Switching to decaffeinated drinks or herbal teas can help to regulate their sleep patterns and help them feel calm before bed.



A consistent sleep routine is essential; try to keep a set time for bed and waking up, so they’re not out of sync each day. The same applies to napping, but this can be a difficult balance to strike. The person living with dementia should nap if they feel tired, as overtiredness can lead to irritability. However, over napping can then interrupt their sleep at bedtime, and so finding a napping schedule that works for them is key.



A comfortable room can help them to feel relaxed. Try to use neutral tones in the bedroom to prevent them from feeling stimulated at nighttime.



Try to keep their daily routine as consistent and simple as possible to help with familiarity and comfort. However, they should also be encouraged to increase their daily exercise and activity levels, as this can promote a need for sleep.



If your loved one is living with dementia and you’re experiencing sundowning, please feel free to contact a member of our team. We’ve had extensive dementia training and would be happy to help you in any way we can. We can also help you explore our care service options.



Alternatively, you may find our previous blog on dementia communication helpful.

19th August

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How to Make Friends in Retirement: Our Guide to Combatting Loneliness

Are you heading into retirement?



When you leave the world of work, you may wonder how it will affect your social life.



Workplaces are ideal for meeting new people and making new friends. Whether it’s breaking the ice with a new colleague or chatting to a client, there are many opportunities to socialise each day.



When you stop working, you may find you have fewer opportunities to interact with others.



Here, we’re looking at how to make friends in retirement:



How to Make Friends in Retirement: Stay in Touch



If your job involved regularly speaking to customers, or you were immersed in a bustling office, you’ll likely be used to spending time with others.



When you retire, it's natural to feel anxious about being disconnected from your friendship group at work; but there's no reason for your dynamic to change too drastically.



Before you leave, consider how you could stay in touch with your colleagues. You may decide that you want to continue on a part-time basis, or that you would just like to be a part of social events moving forward.



Why not arrange to meet them outside of working hours too? You could organise drinks one evening, or invite them out for lunch at the weekend.



Consider Volunteering



Volunteering is a great way to keep busy and stay connected within your community during retirement.



Having the chance to work alongside others will provide you with ample opportunities for making new friends. To strengthen your new friendships, why not invite a few of your co-workers out for dinner?



How to Make Friends in Retirement: Take Up a Hobby



Starting a new hobby can help you meet other like-minded people with similar interests. There are plenty of hobbies you could try; you could join a knitting group, a book club or a walking group, to name a few.



You could consider starting your own group. If you don’t have social media, why not consider setting up an account? You could join Facebook or Instagram, both platforms where you can share photos and updates about your life, and connect with others who do the same.



As well as connecting with your friends and family, you could use this as an opportunity to stay in touch with those who share your hobbies and interests.



Friendships are an important part of life - and as we get older, it becomes even more important to make these connections. Building relationships with others can help to avoid loneliness, whilst also providing you with a strong support network. Socialising, too, helps to further improve cognitive skills, such as memory.



If you’ve found our guide on how to make friends in retirement helpful, why not read our previous blog on community acts to boost camaraderie?



Alternatively, for more information about our care services, please contact a dedicated member of our team.

19th October

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Gardening Tips for Seniors | Making the Most of Your Garden

Are you looking to transform your garden?



No matter what size your outdoor space is, it should be seen as an extension of your home. This week, we’re sharing our gardening tips for seniors to help you transform your garden into a haven.



Gardening Tips for Seniors: Use Garden Mirrors



Mirrors may seem like an unconventional choice of decor for a garden, but when placed mindfully they reflect the space and the light, creating a feeling of openness and making your garden seem larger than it really is.



Carefully placed mirrors can not only create the feeling of a larger outdoor space, but they can also add a unique aesthetic. Why not scour some charity shops to find a large, vintage mirror and create a ‘secret garden’ shabby chic look?



Use Lights to Brighten Up Your Outdoor Space



Solar panelled lights in your flower borders, fairy lights adorning fences and trees, and even garden candles can all contribute to a cosy, relaxed atmosphere, as well as providing much-needed light for your evenings.



You could combine light and warmth with heated lamps, or use a fire pit to help keep you warm and allow you to continue enjoying your garden in the colder months.



Create a Wildflower Area



Wildflowers are a beautiful addition to your garden; the vibrant colours and mismatched flowers create a stunning visual.



They also attract bees and butterflies, so you’ll be doing your bit for the environment whilst enjoying spotting the various insects in your garden.



You could turn your garden borders into a wildflower haven, perhaps on raised beds. These can have a pleasing aesthetic effect, and also reduce the pressure on your back as you tend to them.



Gardening Tips for Seniors: Reuse and Upcycle



From old watering cans to empty jam jars, there are many different everyday items you can transform into pretty adornments for your garden.



You could fill empty jars with solar panelled fairy lights to add a unique twist to your outdoor table, or you could use old watering cans to grow flowers and hang them from your fence.



Old pallets can be transformed into garden furniture, bug hotels, or even a mud kitchen for children and grandchildren. It can be rewarding to capture photos of the progress of your garden transformation and to then take photos of your loved ones enjoying your new garden space once it’s finished.



Use Outdoor Blankets, Cushions and Beanbags



Your garden should be an inviting, relaxing space for you to unwind in; whether it’s alone with a cup of tea after a long day, or with friends for food and drinks.



One of our gardening tips for seniors is having an assortment of outdoor blankets, cushions and beanbags available to encourage you and your guests to make yourself comfortable and settle down for the evening.



A hammock is also a charming idea if you have the space, as this can encourage you to spend more time in the garden. It’ll provide you with a comfortable space for stargazing, bird watching, or even just reading a book.



You may also want to invest in a canopy to provide you with some shelter, so you can continue enjoying your garden even if the weather turns.



A well-designed and considered garden can offer sanctuary from the hustle and bustle of everyday life, particularly throughout your retirement years. Spending time outdoors can help keep you healthy as you get older and improve your overall health and wellbeing, as it can encourage you to move more as you potter around, and increase your sun exposure to help keep your Vitamin D topped up.



For more ways to stay healthy in your senior years, why not read our previous article on healthy breakfast ideas?



Alternatively, to find out more about our care services, please contact a member of our team.

5th October

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Our New Care Home Manager: Meet Claire

Have you met our new care home manager?



We’re delighted to announce the appointment of our newest staff member, Claire. She has joined our team here at The Dell as our new service manager.



Here at The Dell, we provide residential, dementia and respite care for up to 40 people. We offer both day care and supported living services, and pride ourselves on providing the highest levels of care for our many wonderful clients.



Delivering high-quality care is our top priority, and so our hiring system is fine-tuned to ensure we only take on the very best team members. With this in mind, Claire was the ideal candidate for the role.



About Our New Care Home Manager, Claire



Claire has accumulated a wealth of experience since starting her career in care back in 2005. She has previously worked in managerial positions at multiple care homes and hopes to utilise her caring nature and experience to take our home from strength to strength, helping us to continue delivering high quality and person-centred care.



From working throughout the COVID-19 pandemic and experiencing first-hand the difficulties caused by staff shortages and isolation, Claire hopes to ensure continued best practices in our care delivery post-pandemic.



Claire Discusses Her New Role With Us Here at The Dell



Discussing her new role with us here at The Dell, Claire said: “I’m delighted to be a part of the Wellbeing Care team. So far, my opinion is that it is a wonderful place to work - everyone is friendly, warm and caring. Empathetic and dedicated too, the team certainly contributes to The Dell’s homely environment.”



“My favourite part of the job is connecting and engaging with relatives and their families. That is, ultimately, what working in care is all about. I worked in hospitality for years before care. However, I knew when I ventured into care-providing services that I had found my passion. I like to help others and am glad to have found a career that enables me to do so,” Claire continued.



When asked what makes a great team leader, Claire told us, “Being understanding and fair. It’s also about ascertaining responsibility within your role as, by working in a care setting, people rely on you. You are in an important position of trust.”



Moving Forward With Our Newly Appointed Care Home Manager



Farooq Patel, our director here at Wellbeing Care, added “We are over the moon to welcome Claire to our compassionate team of staff. With her strong will, visionary outlook and warm demeanour, we believe her insights – formulated after decades of experience in the healthcare sector – to be invaluable here at Wellbeing Care. She will no doubt be an asset to the team as we continue to build upon and develop the skills of staff and health-providing services post-COVID-19.”



We’re excited for Claire to integrate herself into the home and share her wealth of knowledge, experience and expertise to enable us to continue bettering the already high standard of care we uphold.



If you’d like to know more about our Wellbeing Care services, please contact a member of our team.



Alternatively, to find out how we’re dedicated to improving our services, why not read our previous blog on our training with the Dementia Dictionary?

4th October

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5 Healthy Breakfast Ideas for Seniors | Wellbeing Care

Keen to discover some inspiration for breakfast ideas for seniors?



Breakfast is an important meal as it helps to set you in good stead for the day. Having a fresh, healthy breakfast can help to boost your energy levels and maximise your cognitive abilities.



From avocado on toast to wholesome porridge, we’re taking a look at our top 5 healthy breakfast ideas for seniors:



Breakfast Ideas for Seniors: Poached Eggs and Avocado on Toast



Avocado is a fantastic source of fibre and is packed full of nutrients. The low-carb fruit is also high in ‘monounsaturated fats’, which are essential for maintaining good cholesterol levels. Avocado is classed as a superfood, and is incredibly versatile.



Why not try crushed avocado on seeded, multigrain bread for a healthy breakfast dish? You could add chilli flakes and lime juice for a zingy start to your day.



Poached eggs are full of protein and are a great addition to your avocado on toast; you could even add a handful of spinach or mushrooms for an extra boost of goodness. Why not try a gentle workout, too, for the ultimate health kick?



Fruit Salad With Natural Yoghurt



Fruits are full of vitamins and minerals, making them an ideal breakfast option. They’re versatile, too, so you can adapt them in almost any way you like.



You could try a tropical fruit salad by dicing mango, kiwi, bananas and pineapple, and then balancing the acidity with a generous spoonful of protein-rich natural yoghurt. Given their high nutritional value, fruits can help to improve your heart health, cognitive function, muscle and bone health and boost your immune system.



We recommend adding pomegranate seeds to your morning fruit salad for an extra burst of delicious goodness. The sweet seeds add not only a bright colour to your dish, but they’re also loaded with antioxidants and vitamins, which helps your body by reducing your blood pressure and improving your heart health.



Breakfast Ideas for Seniors: Overnight Oats With Your Choice of Toppings



Overnight oats are a popular healthy breakfast dish; they’re easy to prepare, delicious and packed full of goodness. You’ll enjoy a lasting feeling of fullness, too, since the high fibre content of oats stimulates the release of slow-releasing energy when consumed.



To make overnight oats, simply spoon some oats into a jar (usually 1/2 cup of oats per portion), and soak them overnight in the fridge with ½ cup of milk and/or natural yoghurt. You could mix in a spoonful of peanut butter, too, or a cup of berries to enhance the flavour and nutritional content.



The following morning, remove your oats from the fridge and finish with your choice of toppings. Why not try a drizzle of honey and a handful of mixed berries for a healthy sweet treat?



Here is an easy recipe for delicious overnight oats.



Breakfast Ideas for Seniors: Smoothie Bowls



Smoothie bowls are as simple as they sound: simply whizz up a smoothie, but serve it in a bowl with toppings of your choice! Smoothie bowls do tend to be a little thicker in consistency, though, so be sure to add enough thickening agents so that you can easily eat it with a spoon. Yoghurts and frozen bananas are great thickeners, and provide an extra bit of flavour, too.



We like this spinach and avocado smoothie bowl, which is packed full of vitamins and antioxidants.



You can top with toasted granola, berries and chia seeds to increase your fibre intake and add a little more substance.



Breakfast Ideas for Seniors: Simple Porridge



Porridge is an easy and delicious way to start your day. It’s light enough to leave you feeling comfortable, whilst being filling enough to keep your hunger at bay until lunchtime.



Simply add a ½ cup of oats to 1 cup of milk, and stir over a low/medium heat until it thickens. To serve, you could add a drizzle of honey or a dollop of jam to sweeten it slightly, or you could add berries or banana to change up the texture and flavour.



As porridge oats are a complex carbohydrate, they release energy slowly to help you get through the morning.



At Wellbeing Care, we’re passionate about ensuring our residents enjoy healthy, wholesome diets. If you’d like to know more about our services, please contact a member of our team.



Alternatively, if you’ve enjoyed reading about our healthy breakfast ideas for seniors, why not read our previous blog on hydration and nutrition?

2nd September

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The Importance of Taking Photos and How to Make the Most of Them

This week, we’re looking at the importance of taking photos, and how you can make the most of them.



From scrapbooking to storytelling, photos are wonderful keepsakes of the memories made by you and your loved ones.



Here at Wellbeing Care, we’re looking at the importance of taking photos:



What is the Importance of Taking Photos?



Taking photos is important for preserving the memories made with your loved ones. Photographs can be set-up to mark an important occasion, or candid as you capture a special moment in time.



You may take photos of houses you’ve lived in, places you’ve visited, people you’ve just met and people you love.



As you get older, you realise that sometimes people move away, move on, or even pass away - and often, photographs can provide comfort in these difficult times.



Here at Wellbeing Care, we take plenty of photos; they serve as wonderful keepsakes for our residents and their families. Check out our social media to take a look.



The Importance of Taking Photos: How Can You Make the Most of Your Photos?



You may want to make multiple copies of your favourite photos, so you can share them with your friends and family. You could also have some framed, or slotted into precious family photo albums.



Having photographs of your loved ones around the home can help make a house feel more homely - and will put a smile on your face every time you walk past them.



It’s important for our residents to have their precious memories dotted around our care homes, as this can help them to feel more comfortable and at ease - particularly if they’re new or are living with dementia.



The Importance of Taking Photos: Why are Photo Albums Beneficial?



Pulling out old photo albums and going through them can be a wonderful activity to enjoy alone or with loved ones; it gives you the opportunity to be instantly transported back to that time.



For our residents living with dementia, this can help to hone their memory and induce feelings of happiness and nostalgia. Sharing this experience with others can be special, too - and within a care home setting, it can be a wonderful opportunity for residents to offer insight into their lives.



The Importance of Taking Photos: How Can Scrapbooking Help Those Living With Dementia?



Scrapbooking is a great way to get our residents’ creative juices flowing. It also helps to improve their motor skills as they cut and stick photos, before writing captions for each memory. It can also encourage storytelling as they explain the relevance of each photo.



As time passes, the scrapbook will serve as a treasure that offers wonderful memories to savour, and can eventually be passed onto family members.



So, remember to continue taking photos - and then frame them, share them, or scrapbook them.



If your loved one is living with dementia, why not read our previous blog on the effects of Sundowners Syndrome?



Alternatively, please contact a member of our team for more information about our Wellbeing Care services.

26th August

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What is Sundowners Syndrome? | Exploring the Effects of Sundowning

Do you find that your loved one who is living with dementia often deteriorates towards the end of the day?



They may be experiencing ‘sundowning’ - a term coined to describe the effects of a person living with dementia as the sun sets and evening draws in.



Here at Wellbeing Care, we’re exploring the possible causes and symptoms as we ask the question, ‘what is Sundowners Syndrome?’



What is Sundowners Syndrome?



The term sundowning describes how a person living with dementia often becomes increasingly more irritable as the day progresses. They may begin to find conversations or tasks more difficult, and their behaviours may begin to regress as their mood deteriorates.



This can be particularly worrisome for family members, particularly if there have been signs of improvement or cognitive stability earlier in the day. The concept of Sundowner Syndrome relates to the idea that tiredness can creep in and affect the person living with dementia drastically.



Many people find that as they near their bedtime, they may not function quite so well. Their body and brain are entering a shutdown state ready for slumber, and so their cognitive abilities become less sharp. This is a perfectly normal response to our bodies preparing for rest and is caused by a reduction in dopamine levels and an increase in melatonin production, but it can have a heavier and more negative effect on someone who is living with dementia.



This is because their bodies don’t produce as much melatonin, leading to disrupted sleep patterns and restlessness. Also, because their cognitive capabilities are already in decline and they’re already a bit hazy, the period where their brains then start to shut down for bed can be far more noticeable and, often, distressing. They’re already in a state of confusion, and so tiredness can amplify this and cause them to perhaps become more forgetful and misbehave or lash out.



How to Reduce the Effects of Sundowners Syndrome



Whilst this is an unpleasant situation for the person living with dementia and their loved ones, there are some helpful tools to help reduce the effects, and limit the period they go on for. We do recommend that you also speak to your loved one’s healthcare provider for further advice and treatment options to help ease the sundowning effects.



Try to reduce or omit their caffeine intake. Caffeine is a brain stimulant and can affect the body’s internal body clock. Switching to decaffeinated drinks or herbal teas can help to regulate their sleep patterns and help them feel calm before bed.



A consistent sleep routine is essential; try to keep a set time for bed and waking up, so they’re not out of sync each day. The same applies to napping, but this can be a difficult balance to strike. The person living with dementia should nap if they feel tired, as overtiredness can lead to irritability. However, over napping can then interrupt their sleep at bedtime, and so finding a napping schedule that works for them is key.



A comfortable room can help them to feel relaxed. Try to use neutral tones in the bedroom to prevent them from feeling stimulated at nighttime.



Try to keep their daily routine as consistent and simple as possible to help with familiarity and comfort. However, they should also be encouraged to increase their daily exercise and activity levels, as this can promote a need for sleep.



If your loved one is living with dementia and you’re experiencing sundowning, please feel free to contact a member of our team. We’ve had extensive dementia training and would be happy to help you in any way we can. We can also help you explore our care service options.



Alternatively, you may find our previous blog on dementia communication helpful.

19th August