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News

With so much going on in our homes, it can be difficult to keep up! That’s why we regularly update this news page with our latest goings-on at Wellbeing Care in Oulton Broad, Beccles and Irchester so you can check back and find out what we’ve been up to.

Follow us on Facebook and Twitter too to be the first to know about all sorts, including our upcoming events, activities, birthday celebrations and team news.

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5 Healthy Breakfast Ideas for Seniors | Wellbeing Care

Keen to discover some inspiration for breakfast ideas for seniors?



Breakfast is an important meal as it helps to set you in good stead for the day. Having a fresh, healthy breakfast can help to boost your energy levels and maximise your cognitive abilities.



From avocado on toast to wholesome porridge, we’re taking a look at our top 5 healthy breakfast ideas for seniors:



Breakfast Ideas for Seniors: Poached Eggs and Avocado on Toast



Avocado is a fantastic source of fibre and is packed full of nutrients. The low-carb fruit is also high in ‘monounsaturated fats’, which are essential for maintaining good cholesterol levels. Avocado is classed as a superfood, and is incredibly versatile.



Why not try crushed avocado on seeded, multigrain bread for a healthy breakfast dish? You could add chilli flakes and lime juice for a zingy start to your day.



Poached eggs are full of protein and are a great addition to your avocado on toast; you could even add a handful of spinach or mushrooms for an extra boost of goodness. Why not try a gentle workout, too, for the ultimate health kick?



Fruit Salad With Natural Yoghurt



Fruits are full of vitamins and minerals, making them an ideal breakfast option. They’re versatile, too, so you can adapt them in almost any way you like.



You could try a tropical fruit salad by dicing mango, kiwi, bananas and pineapple, and then balancing the acidity with a generous spoonful of protein-rich natural yoghurt. Given their high nutritional value, fruits can help to improve your heart health, cognitive function, muscle and bone health and boost your immune system.



We recommend adding pomegranate seeds to your morning fruit salad for an extra burst of delicious goodness. The sweet seeds add not only a bright colour to your dish, but they’re also loaded with antioxidants and vitamins, which helps your body by reducing your blood pressure and improving your heart health.



Breakfast Ideas for Seniors: Overnight Oats With Your Choice of Toppings



Overnight oats are a popular healthy breakfast dish; they’re easy to prepare, delicious and packed full of goodness. You’ll enjoy a lasting feeling of fullness, too, since the high fibre content of oats stimulates the release of slow-releasing energy when consumed.



To make overnight oats, simply spoon some oats into a jar (usually 1/2 cup of oats per portion), and soak them overnight in the fridge with ½ cup of milk and/or natural yoghurt. You could mix in a spoonful of peanut butter, too, or a cup of berries to enhance the flavour and nutritional content.



The following morning, remove your oats from the fridge and finish with your choice of toppings. Why not try a drizzle of honey and a handful of mixed berries for a healthy sweet treat?



Here is an easy recipe for delicious overnight oats.



Breakfast Ideas for Seniors: Smoothie Bowls



Smoothie bowls are as simple as they sound: simply whizz up a smoothie, but serve it in a bowl with toppings of your choice! Smoothie bowls do tend to be a little thicker in consistency, though, so be sure to add enough thickening agents so that you can easily eat it with a spoon. Yoghurts and frozen bananas are great thickeners, and provide an extra bit of flavour, too.



We like this spinach and avocado smoothie bowl, which is packed full of vitamins and antioxidants.



You can top with toasted granola, berries and chia seeds to increase your fibre intake and add a little more substance.



Breakfast Ideas for Seniors: Simple Porridge



Porridge is an easy and delicious way to start your day. It’s light enough to leave you feeling comfortable, whilst being filling enough to keep your hunger at bay until lunchtime.



Simply add a ½ cup of oats to 1 cup of milk, and stir over a low/medium heat until it thickens. To serve, you could add a drizzle of honey or a dollop of jam to sweeten it slightly, or you could add berries or banana to change up the texture and flavour.



As porridge oats are a complex carbohydrate, they release energy slowly to help you get through the morning.



At Wellbeing Care, we’re passionate about ensuring our residents enjoy healthy, wholesome diets. If you’d like to know more about our services, please contact a member of our team.



Alternatively, if you’ve enjoyed reading about our healthy breakfast ideas for seniors, why not read our previous blog on hydration and nutrition?

2nd September

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The Importance of Taking Photos and How to Make the Most of Them

This week, we’re looking at the importance of taking photos, and how you can make the most of them.



From scrapbooking to storytelling, photos are wonderful keepsakes of the memories made by you and your loved ones.



Here at Wellbeing Care, we’re looking at the importance of taking photos:



What is the Importance of Taking Photos?



Taking photos is important for preserving the memories made with your loved ones. Photographs can be set-up to mark an important occasion, or candid as you capture a special moment in time.



You may take photos of houses you’ve lived in, places you’ve visited, people you’ve just met and people you love.



As you get older, you realise that sometimes people move away, move on, or even pass away - and often, photographs can provide comfort in these difficult times.



Here at Wellbeing Care, we take plenty of photos; they serve as wonderful keepsakes for our residents and their families. Check out our social media to take a look.



The Importance of Taking Photos: How Can You Make the Most of Your Photos?



You may want to make multiple copies of your favourite photos, so you can share them with your friends and family. You could also have some framed, or slotted into precious family photo albums.



Having photographs of your loved ones around the home can help make a house feel more homely - and will put a smile on your face every time you walk past them.



It’s important for our residents to have their precious memories dotted around our care homes, as this can help them to feel more comfortable and at ease - particularly if they’re new or are living with dementia.



The Importance of Taking Photos: Why are Photo Albums Beneficial?



Pulling out old photo albums and going through them can be a wonderful activity to enjoy alone or with loved ones; it gives you the opportunity to be instantly transported back to that time.



For our residents living with dementia, this can help to hone their memory and induce feelings of happiness and nostalgia. Sharing this experience with others can be special, too - and within a care home setting, it can be a wonderful opportunity for residents to offer insight into their lives.



The Importance of Taking Photos: How Can Scrapbooking Help Those Living With Dementia?



Scrapbooking is a great way to get our residents’ creative juices flowing. It also helps to improve their motor skills as they cut and stick photos, before writing captions for each memory. It can also encourage storytelling as they explain the relevance of each photo.



As time passes, the scrapbook will serve as a treasure that offers wonderful memories to savour, and can eventually be passed onto family members.



So, remember to continue taking photos - and then frame them, share them, or scrapbook them.



If your loved one is living with dementia, why not read our previous blog on the effects of Sundowners Syndrome?



Alternatively, please contact a member of our team for more information about our Wellbeing Care services.

26th August

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What is Sundowners Syndrome? | Exploring the Effects of Sundowning

Do you find that your loved one who is living with dementia often deteriorates towards the end of the day?



They may be experiencing ‘sundowning’ - a term coined to describe the effects of a person living with dementia as the sun sets and evening draws in.



Here at Wellbeing Care, we’re exploring the possible causes and symptoms as we ask the question, ‘what is Sundowners Syndrome?’



What is Sundowners Syndrome?



The term sundowning describes how a person living with dementia often becomes increasingly more irritable as the day progresses. They may begin to find conversations or tasks more difficult, and their behaviours may begin to regress as their mood deteriorates.



This can be particularly worrisome for family members, particularly if there have been signs of improvement or cognitive stability earlier in the day. The concept of Sundowner Syndrome relates to the idea that tiredness can creep in and affect the person living with dementia drastically.



Many people find that as they near their bedtime, they may not function quite so well. Their body and brain are entering a shutdown state ready for slumber, and so their cognitive abilities become less sharp. This is a perfectly normal response to our bodies preparing for rest and is caused by a reduction in dopamine levels and an increase in melatonin production, but it can have a heavier and more negative effect on someone who is living with dementia.



This is because their bodies don’t produce as much melatonin, leading to disrupted sleep patterns and restlessness. Also, because their cognitive capabilities are already in decline and they’re already a bit hazy, the period where their brains then start to shut down for bed can be far more noticeable and, often, distressing. They’re already in a state of confusion, and so tiredness can amplify this and cause them to perhaps become more forgetful and misbehave or lash out.



How to Reduce the Effects of Sundowners Syndrome



Whilst this is an unpleasant situation for the person living with dementia and their loved ones, there are some helpful tools to help reduce the effects, and limit the period they go on for. We do recommend that you also speak to your loved one’s healthcare provider for further advice and treatment options to help ease the sundowning effects.



Try to reduce or omit their caffeine intake. Caffeine is a brain stimulant and can affect the body’s internal body clock. Switching to decaffeinated drinks or herbal teas can help to regulate their sleep patterns and help them feel calm before bed.



A consistent sleep routine is essential; try to keep a set time for bed and waking up, so they’re not out of sync each day. The same applies to napping, but this can be a difficult balance to strike. The person living with dementia should nap if they feel tired, as overtiredness can lead to irritability. However, over napping can then interrupt their sleep at bedtime, and so finding a napping schedule that works for them is key.



A comfortable room can help them to feel relaxed. Try to use neutral tones in the bedroom to prevent them from feeling stimulated at nighttime.



Try to keep their daily routine as consistent and simple as possible to help with familiarity and comfort. However, they should also be encouraged to increase their daily exercise and activity levels, as this can promote a need for sleep.



If your loved one is living with dementia and you’re experiencing sundowning, please feel free to contact a member of our team. We’ve had extensive dementia training and would be happy to help you in any way we can. We can also help you explore our care service options.



Alternatively, you may find our previous blog on dementia communication helpful.

19th August

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Wellbeing Care Covid-19 Letter to family members and colleagues

Dear family members and colleagues,

Thank you for your continued support and patience throughout what has been an incredibly difficult time for us all.

As ever, the health, safety and wellbeing of our residents and colleagues are always our top priorities. We have therefore continued to implement and adhere to rigorous health and safety practices across our homes.

As such, we have continued to wear full PPE to ensure that the safety of our residents, staff and visitors is maximised at all times.

For comprehensive information about the coronavirus itself, please visit either the Gov.UK or NHS websites or if you are concerned you or someone you are in contact with has coronavirus call 111.

Visiting our Care Home

At Wellbeing Care, it is important to us that our residents see their families and friends as much as possible, without ever compromising their health and safety.

Now that visiting restrictions are eased, we’re pleased to announce that there is no limit on the number of ‘named visitors’ that a single resident can have, and no nationally set limit on the number of visitors in a single day.

We would like to stress, however, that the safety of our residents is paramount; so we ask that you take an at-home lateral flow test in advance of your visit. Additionally, we request that you wear the appropriate PPE on arrival (please contact a member of our team for more details).

Please do not attempt to arrange a visit to our care home for any reason if you currently feel unwell, particularly if you have a cough, a fever or high temperature, or have shortness of breath, or if you have been in contact with someone who may have coronavirus.

How to safely visit a care home

If you are making an essential visit to a care home, it is important that you do so safely and in a way that minimises the risk of infection to our residents and staff. Please consider the following before, during and after visiting our care home:

Hand washing

It is important that you wash your hands thoroughly before you visit the care home, and regularly whilst you are at the home. Please make sure you wash your hands for a minimum of 20 seconds, using either hot water and soap or 60% alcohol sanitiser gel. The NHS has a video guide to effective handwashing here. Additional handwashing stations have been set up at our homes to help visitors wash their hands regularly.

Coughs and sneezes

We understand there are many reasons why someone may cough or sneeze. However, whilst visiting a care home please make sure you have a tissue on you at all times so that you can catch a cough or sneeze. Please then immediately dispose of the tissue in the bin. Remember - Catch it. Bin it. Kill it.

Day Care

Due to the current coronavirus outbreak, Wellbeing Care has taken the decision to temporarily suspend activities at Wellbeing Day Centre from Monday 23rd March.

This is not a decision that has been taken lightly, but we must do everything we can to protect the health and safety of all the people we care for, including our Day Care service users, and our Colleagues. Government guidance on social distancing also advises people aged 70 or older to be particularly stringent in following social distancing measures.

We have informed all of our current Day Care Service Users and provided information to support decisions about alternative care arrangements at this time.

Protecting our Residents and Colleagues

Please be assured that Wellbeing Care is treating this matter with the appropriate seriousness and comprehensive contingency plans are in place in the event of a coronavirus outbreak at a home.

In response to the growing UK coronavirus outbreak, we have created a dedicated steering group. Led by our Director, Operations Manager and Service Managers. This group includes ideas from across the business to review and develop plans, reflecting the situation.

The Wellbeing Care steering group has taken appropriate steps to secure the supplies, establish policies and protocols in the event of an outbreak in a home, and develop plans to ensure Wellbeing Care homes can continue to provide premium care during this time. This way, residents entrusted in our care remain safe and their needs well looked after.

Home managers and staff are aware of the contingency and have been really positive to help prevent the spread of infection. This includes establishing hand washing stations in the reception areas of all homes, installing additional prominent signage about handwashing, and completing the infection control.

Admissions

We are continuing to admit new residents where possible and appropriate, to help ease the pressure on the local NHS and the wider system. We will do all we can to help the local health and Adult Social Care (ASC) teams and the people who need care at this time. Please note we may request a remote assessment to reflect the current situation. Should you wish to make an enquiry, please contact the care home directly.

Further Information

Official coronavirus (Covid-19) information about the coronavirus itself, or if you are concerned you or someone you are in contact with has coronavirus, please visit either the Gov.UK or NHS websites.

For anyone connected to a Wellbeing Care home or service, please call the Home Manager at your local home for more information.

Phone numbers for all homes are listed on the individual home pages.

19th August

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5 Highly Effective Ways to Deliver Person-Centred Care

How can you deliver person-centred care effectively?



Person-centred care ensures that care recipients are treated with dignity and respect at all times; something we value highly here at Wellbeing Care.



This week, we’re looking at the different ways to deliver person-centred care:



Ways to Deliver Person Centred Care: Listen to the Care Recipient



Listening is a vital tool you can use to ensure that you’re respecting your care recipient and helping them feel validated.



Have conversations with them and ask them how they’re feeling, what they’re looking forward to, what they want - but, most importantly, listen to their answers. Take into account their thoughts and feelings and respect their wishes.



This is important in person-centred care because you can then adjust your care plan for the day accordingly. For example, they may be feeling tired, and so you can rearrange your activities and have a quieter, more restful day.



Ways to Deliver Person-Centred Care: Respect Their Values



Your care recipient may have differing opinions, values, beliefs, culture, religion or preferences to you. This can sometimes lead to feelings of frustration, but it’s important to respect their views and accommodate them wherever possible.



This can help them to feel validated and respected, and able to live their life in the way they would have previously. This doesn’t need to compromise your own views in any way, but it might be worth looking at how you can accommodate both of your values in day-to-day care.



Enable Them to Enjoy Life



Requiring care doesn’t have to stop your care recipient from being able to enjoy life. They can still have a fun and fulfilling social life, where they can interact with others, take part in activities and discover new hobbies and interests.



As a carer delivering person-centred care, you can enable them to achieve this by organising activities, excursions and meetings with other people, such as at memory cafes or day centres.



Actively encouraging your care recipient to get involved and take part in activities can help them to build new and meaningful relationships with others and improve their overall quality of life.



Get to Know Them



Getting to know your care recipient fully can help you to understand who they are as a person and forge a more meaningful relationship with them. It can also help you to plan their care and activities as you’ll have a better understanding of their likes and dislikes.



For example, it can be beneficial to know about their childhood and family, previous jobs, schooling and hobbies. This can help you get to know them better and help to prompt interesting conversations.



Accommodate Their Independence



Your care recipient will likely want to retain as much of their independence as possible, so it can be beneficial to look at how you can accommodate this.



From sourcing equipment to make daily living more comfortable and accessible, to including them in their care plan, it’s important for them to have a say and feel able to do what they can for themselves.



Their family and loved ones may also want to be involved in the planning of their care, and so it’s vital that you take their ideas and opinions into account and try to accommodate them where possible.



At Wellbeing Care, adhering to a person-centred approach is integral within our services. As a result, the care plans we deliver aim to focus not only on medical requirements but also on emotional needs. On a day-to-day basis, this involves actively involving our residents in decisions made about their care as we endeavour to ensure that individual needs and desires are met.



If you’ve found our guide on ways to deliver person-centred care helpful, why not read our previous blog on communication aids for dementia?



Alternatively, please contact a member of our team for more information about our care services.

9th August

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5 Benefits of Online Volunteering: Opening up a World of Opportunities

Have you taken part in any online volunteering?



With so many opportunities arising for volunteering online, we’re looking into the benefits of online volunteering - from ample socialising opportunities to skill development.



Online Volunteering Instils a Sense of Purpose



One of the many benefits of online volunteering is that it can instil a sense of purpose. Particularly over the past year when we were isolated at home, online volunteering opened up a world of possibilities and interactions that you may not have had the chance to access before.



Being able to participate in online volunteering helps you to feel a part of something big and get involved in the community, and you’ll feel good for helping to make a difference.



Online Volunteering Offers a Chance to Connect



Another of the benefits of online volunteering is that it offers you the chance to meet new people online and connect with like-minded individuals.



This can help to reduce loneliness by providing you with plenty of opportunities to interact with people, as well as rallying a sense of community when completing a project together.



Why not look at ways you could come together - perhaps you could organise an online raffle to raise money for your local area?



Online Volunteering is Flexible



Online volunteering can offer you flexibility when you participate, since you don't necessarily have to leave the house. This means that you may be able to volunteer when you haven’t previously been able to because you can work around other commitments.



The convenience of volunteering from home means that you may be able to do much more for your chosen project or group, and won’t have to worry about transport, costs or timings.



Online Volunteering Can Help to Broaden Your Skill Set



Volunteering online can help you to improve your computer skills, which can then benefit other areas of your life.



Being able to efficiently use a computer for all your volunteering can boost your confidence, and as these skills are transferable you can use them in other aspects of your life, such as getting a new job or doing an online course.



You may improve your skills on online polls, social media platforms, spreadsheets, or emails; all of these can be extremely useful in everyday life or in your line of work.



Online Volunteering Can Help You to Feel Good



Helping others and volunteering your time can help you to feel good about yourself, and boost your mood.



Having regular interactions, doing something useful and making a difference in people’s lives can all contribute to improving your mental health and helping you to feel good.



Volunteering online can encourage you to feel proud of yourself for the important work you’re doing, and you’ll feel accomplished when your efforts come to fruition.



If you’ve enjoyed reading about the benefits of online volunteering, why not read our previous blog on selfless acts to boost camaraderie?



If you’d like more information about Wellbeing Care, please contact a member of our team.

4th August

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5 Healthy Breakfast Ideas for Seniors | Wellbeing Care

Keen to discover some inspiration for breakfast ideas for seniors?



Breakfast is an important meal as it helps to set you in good stead for the day. Having a fresh, healthy breakfast can help to boost your energy levels and maximise your cognitive abilities.



From avocado on toast to wholesome porridge, we’re taking a look at our top 5 healthy breakfast ideas for seniors:



Breakfast Ideas for Seniors: Poached Eggs and Avocado on Toast



Avocado is a fantastic source of fibre and is packed full of nutrients. The low-carb fruit is also high in ‘monounsaturated fats’, which are essential for maintaining good cholesterol levels. Avocado is classed as a superfood, and is incredibly versatile.



Why not try crushed avocado on seeded, multigrain bread for a healthy breakfast dish? You could add chilli flakes and lime juice for a zingy start to your day.



Poached eggs are full of protein and are a great addition to your avocado on toast; you could even add a handful of spinach or mushrooms for an extra boost of goodness. Why not try a gentle workout, too, for the ultimate health kick?



Fruit Salad With Natural Yoghurt



Fruits are full of vitamins and minerals, making them an ideal breakfast option. They’re versatile, too, so you can adapt them in almost any way you like.



You could try a tropical fruit salad by dicing mango, kiwi, bananas and pineapple, and then balancing the acidity with a generous spoonful of protein-rich natural yoghurt. Given their high nutritional value, fruits can help to improve your heart health, cognitive function, muscle and bone health and boost your immune system.



We recommend adding pomegranate seeds to your morning fruit salad for an extra burst of delicious goodness. The sweet seeds add not only a bright colour to your dish, but they’re also loaded with antioxidants and vitamins, which helps your body by reducing your blood pressure and improving your heart health.



Breakfast Ideas for Seniors: Overnight Oats With Your Choice of Toppings



Overnight oats are a popular healthy breakfast dish; they’re easy to prepare, delicious and packed full of goodness. You’ll enjoy a lasting feeling of fullness, too, since the high fibre content of oats stimulates the release of slow-releasing energy when consumed.



To make overnight oats, simply spoon some oats into a jar (usually 1/2 cup of oats per portion), and soak them overnight in the fridge with ½ cup of milk and/or natural yoghurt. You could mix in a spoonful of peanut butter, too, or a cup of berries to enhance the flavour and nutritional content.



The following morning, remove your oats from the fridge and finish with your choice of toppings. Why not try a drizzle of honey and a handful of mixed berries for a healthy sweet treat?



Here is an easy recipe for delicious overnight oats.



Breakfast Ideas for Seniors: Smoothie Bowls



Smoothie bowls are as simple as they sound: simply whizz up a smoothie, but serve it in a bowl with toppings of your choice! Smoothie bowls do tend to be a little thicker in consistency, though, so be sure to add enough thickening agents so that you can easily eat it with a spoon. Yoghurts and frozen bananas are great thickeners, and provide an extra bit of flavour, too.



We like this spinach and avocado smoothie bowl, which is packed full of vitamins and antioxidants.



You can top with toasted granola, berries and chia seeds to increase your fibre intake and add a little more substance.



Breakfast Ideas for Seniors: Simple Porridge



Porridge is an easy and delicious way to start your day. It’s light enough to leave you feeling comfortable, whilst being filling enough to keep your hunger at bay until lunchtime.



Simply add a ½ cup of oats to 1 cup of milk, and stir over a low/medium heat until it thickens. To serve, you could add a drizzle of honey or a dollop of jam to sweeten it slightly, or you could add berries or banana to change up the texture and flavour.



As porridge oats are a complex carbohydrate, they release energy slowly to help you get through the morning.



At Wellbeing Care, we’re passionate about ensuring our residents enjoy healthy, wholesome diets. If you’d like to know more about our services, please contact a member of our team.



Alternatively, if you’ve enjoyed reading about our healthy breakfast ideas for seniors, why not read our previous blog on hydration and nutrition?

2nd September

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The Importance of Taking Photos and How to Make the Most of Them

This week, we’re looking at the importance of taking photos, and how you can make the most of them.



From scrapbooking to storytelling, photos are wonderful keepsakes of the memories made by you and your loved ones.



Here at Wellbeing Care, we’re looking at the importance of taking photos:



What is the Importance of Taking Photos?



Taking photos is important for preserving the memories made with your loved ones. Photographs can be set-up to mark an important occasion, or candid as you capture a special moment in time.



You may take photos of houses you’ve lived in, places you’ve visited, people you’ve just met and people you love.



As you get older, you realise that sometimes people move away, move on, or even pass away - and often, photographs can provide comfort in these difficult times.



Here at Wellbeing Care, we take plenty of photos; they serve as wonderful keepsakes for our residents and their families. Check out our social media to take a look.



The Importance of Taking Photos: How Can You Make the Most of Your Photos?



You may want to make multiple copies of your favourite photos, so you can share them with your friends and family. You could also have some framed, or slotted into precious family photo albums.



Having photographs of your loved ones around the home can help make a house feel more homely - and will put a smile on your face every time you walk past them.



It’s important for our residents to have their precious memories dotted around our care homes, as this can help them to feel more comfortable and at ease - particularly if they’re new or are living with dementia.



The Importance of Taking Photos: Why are Photo Albums Beneficial?



Pulling out old photo albums and going through them can be a wonderful activity to enjoy alone or with loved ones; it gives you the opportunity to be instantly transported back to that time.



For our residents living with dementia, this can help to hone their memory and induce feelings of happiness and nostalgia. Sharing this experience with others can be special, too - and within a care home setting, it can be a wonderful opportunity for residents to offer insight into their lives.



The Importance of Taking Photos: How Can Scrapbooking Help Those Living With Dementia?



Scrapbooking is a great way to get our residents’ creative juices flowing. It also helps to improve their motor skills as they cut and stick photos, before writing captions for each memory. It can also encourage storytelling as they explain the relevance of each photo.



As time passes, the scrapbook will serve as a treasure that offers wonderful memories to savour, and can eventually be passed onto family members.



So, remember to continue taking photos - and then frame them, share them, or scrapbook them.



If your loved one is living with dementia, why not read our previous blog on the effects of Sundowners Syndrome?



Alternatively, please contact a member of our team for more information about our Wellbeing Care services.

26th August

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What is Sundowners Syndrome? | Exploring the Effects of Sundowning

Do you find that your loved one who is living with dementia often deteriorates towards the end of the day?



They may be experiencing ‘sundowning’ - a term coined to describe the effects of a person living with dementia as the sun sets and evening draws in.



Here at Wellbeing Care, we’re exploring the possible causes and symptoms as we ask the question, ‘what is Sundowners Syndrome?’



What is Sundowners Syndrome?



The term sundowning describes how a person living with dementia often becomes increasingly more irritable as the day progresses. They may begin to find conversations or tasks more difficult, and their behaviours may begin to regress as their mood deteriorates.



This can be particularly worrisome for family members, particularly if there have been signs of improvement or cognitive stability earlier in the day. The concept of Sundowner Syndrome relates to the idea that tiredness can creep in and affect the person living with dementia drastically.



Many people find that as they near their bedtime, they may not function quite so well. Their body and brain are entering a shutdown state ready for slumber, and so their cognitive abilities become less sharp. This is a perfectly normal response to our bodies preparing for rest and is caused by a reduction in dopamine levels and an increase in melatonin production, but it can have a heavier and more negative effect on someone who is living with dementia.



This is because their bodies don’t produce as much melatonin, leading to disrupted sleep patterns and restlessness. Also, because their cognitive capabilities are already in decline and they’re already a bit hazy, the period where their brains then start to shut down for bed can be far more noticeable and, often, distressing. They’re already in a state of confusion, and so tiredness can amplify this and cause them to perhaps become more forgetful and misbehave or lash out.



How to Reduce the Effects of Sundowners Syndrome



Whilst this is an unpleasant situation for the person living with dementia and their loved ones, there are some helpful tools to help reduce the effects, and limit the period they go on for. We do recommend that you also speak to your loved one’s healthcare provider for further advice and treatment options to help ease the sundowning effects.



Try to reduce or omit their caffeine intake. Caffeine is a brain stimulant and can affect the body’s internal body clock. Switching to decaffeinated drinks or herbal teas can help to regulate their sleep patterns and help them feel calm before bed.



A consistent sleep routine is essential; try to keep a set time for bed and waking up, so they’re not out of sync each day. The same applies to napping, but this can be a difficult balance to strike. The person living with dementia should nap if they feel tired, as overtiredness can lead to irritability. However, over napping can then interrupt their sleep at bedtime, and so finding a napping schedule that works for them is key.



A comfortable room can help them to feel relaxed. Try to use neutral tones in the bedroom to prevent them from feeling stimulated at nighttime.



Try to keep their daily routine as consistent and simple as possible to help with familiarity and comfort. However, they should also be encouraged to increase their daily exercise and activity levels, as this can promote a need for sleep.



If your loved one is living with dementia and you’re experiencing sundowning, please feel free to contact a member of our team. We’ve had extensive dementia training and would be happy to help you in any way we can. We can also help you explore our care service options.



Alternatively, you may find our previous blog on dementia communication helpful.

19th August

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Wellbeing Care Covid-19 Letter to family members and colleagues

Dear family members and colleagues,

Thank you for your continued support and patience throughout what has been an incredibly difficult time for us all.

As ever, the health, safety and wellbeing of our residents and colleagues are always our top priorities. We have therefore continued to implement and adhere to rigorous health and safety practices across our homes.

As such, we have continued to wear full PPE to ensure that the safety of our residents, staff and visitors is maximised at all times.

For comprehensive information about the coronavirus itself, please visit either the Gov.UK or NHS websites or if you are concerned you or someone you are in contact with has coronavirus call 111.

Visiting our Care Home

At Wellbeing Care, it is important to us that our residents see their families and friends as much as possible, without ever compromising their health and safety.

Now that visiting restrictions are eased, we’re pleased to announce that there is no limit on the number of ‘named visitors’ that a single resident can have, and no nationally set limit on the number of visitors in a single day.

We would like to stress, however, that the safety of our residents is paramount; so we ask that you take an at-home lateral flow test in advance of your visit. Additionally, we request that you wear the appropriate PPE on arrival (please contact a member of our team for more details).

Please do not attempt to arrange a visit to our care home for any reason if you currently feel unwell, particularly if you have a cough, a fever or high temperature, or have shortness of breath, or if you have been in contact with someone who may have coronavirus.

How to safely visit a care home

If you are making an essential visit to a care home, it is important that you do so safely and in a way that minimises the risk of infection to our residents and staff. Please consider the following before, during and after visiting our care home:

Hand washing

It is important that you wash your hands thoroughly before you visit the care home, and regularly whilst you are at the home. Please make sure you wash your hands for a minimum of 20 seconds, using either hot water and soap or 60% alcohol sanitiser gel. The NHS has a video guide to effective handwashing here. Additional handwashing stations have been set up at our homes to help visitors wash their hands regularly.

Coughs and sneezes

We understand there are many reasons why someone may cough or sneeze. However, whilst visiting a care home please make sure you have a tissue on you at all times so that you can catch a cough or sneeze. Please then immediately dispose of the tissue in the bin. Remember - Catch it. Bin it. Kill it.

Day Care

Due to the current coronavirus outbreak, Wellbeing Care has taken the decision to temporarily suspend activities at Wellbeing Day Centre from Monday 23rd March.

This is not a decision that has been taken lightly, but we must do everything we can to protect the health and safety of all the people we care for, including our Day Care service users, and our Colleagues. Government guidance on social distancing also advises people aged 70 or older to be particularly stringent in following social distancing measures.

We have informed all of our current Day Care Service Users and provided information to support decisions about alternative care arrangements at this time.

Protecting our Residents and Colleagues

Please be assured that Wellbeing Care is treating this matter with the appropriate seriousness and comprehensive contingency plans are in place in the event of a coronavirus outbreak at a home.

In response to the growing UK coronavirus outbreak, we have created a dedicated steering group. Led by our Director, Operations Manager and Service Managers. This group includes ideas from across the business to review and develop plans, reflecting the situation.

The Wellbeing Care steering group has taken appropriate steps to secure the supplies, establish policies and protocols in the event of an outbreak in a home, and develop plans to ensure Wellbeing Care homes can continue to provide premium care during this time. This way, residents entrusted in our care remain safe and their needs well looked after.

Home managers and staff are aware of the contingency and have been really positive to help prevent the spread of infection. This includes establishing hand washing stations in the reception areas of all homes, installing additional prominent signage about handwashing, and completing the infection control.

Admissions

We are continuing to admit new residents where possible and appropriate, to help ease the pressure on the local NHS and the wider system. We will do all we can to help the local health and Adult Social Care (ASC) teams and the people who need care at this time. Please note we may request a remote assessment to reflect the current situation. Should you wish to make an enquiry, please contact the care home directly.

Further Information

Official coronavirus (Covid-19) information about the coronavirus itself, or if you are concerned you or someone you are in contact with has coronavirus, please visit either the Gov.UK or NHS websites.

For anyone connected to a Wellbeing Care home or service, please call the Home Manager at your local home for more information.

Phone numbers for all homes are listed on the individual home pages.

19th August

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5 Highly Effective Ways to Deliver Person-Centred Care

How can you deliver person-centred care effectively?



Person-centred care ensures that care recipients are treated with dignity and respect at all times; something we value highly here at Wellbeing Care.



This week, we’re looking at the different ways to deliver person-centred care:



Ways to Deliver Person Centred Care: Listen to the Care Recipient



Listening is a vital tool you can use to ensure that you’re respecting your care recipient and helping them feel validated.



Have conversations with them and ask them how they’re feeling, what they’re looking forward to, what they want - but, most importantly, listen to their answers. Take into account their thoughts and feelings and respect their wishes.



This is important in person-centred care because you can then adjust your care plan for the day accordingly. For example, they may be feeling tired, and so you can rearrange your activities and have a quieter, more restful day.



Ways to Deliver Person-Centred Care: Respect Their Values



Your care recipient may have differing opinions, values, beliefs, culture, religion or preferences to you. This can sometimes lead to feelings of frustration, but it’s important to respect their views and accommodate them wherever possible.



This can help them to feel validated and respected, and able to live their life in the way they would have previously. This doesn’t need to compromise your own views in any way, but it might be worth looking at how you can accommodate both of your values in day-to-day care.



Enable Them to Enjoy Life



Requiring care doesn’t have to stop your care recipient from being able to enjoy life. They can still have a fun and fulfilling social life, where they can interact with others, take part in activities and discover new hobbies and interests.



As a carer delivering person-centred care, you can enable them to achieve this by organising activities, excursions and meetings with other people, such as at memory cafes or day centres.



Actively encouraging your care recipient to get involved and take part in activities can help them to build new and meaningful relationships with others and improve their overall quality of life.



Get to Know Them



Getting to know your care recipient fully can help you to understand who they are as a person and forge a more meaningful relationship with them. It can also help you to plan their care and activities as you’ll have a better understanding of their likes and dislikes.



For example, it can be beneficial to know about their childhood and family, previous jobs, schooling and hobbies. This can help you get to know them better and help to prompt interesting conversations.



Accommodate Their Independence



Your care recipient will likely want to retain as much of their independence as possible, so it can be beneficial to look at how you can accommodate this.



From sourcing equipment to make daily living more comfortable and accessible, to including them in their care plan, it’s important for them to have a say and feel able to do what they can for themselves.



Their family and loved ones may also want to be involved in the planning of their care, and so it’s vital that you take their ideas and opinions into account and try to accommodate them where possible.



At Wellbeing Care, adhering to a person-centred approach is integral within our services. As a result, the care plans we deliver aim to focus not only on medical requirements but also on emotional needs. On a day-to-day basis, this involves actively involving our residents in decisions made about their care as we endeavour to ensure that individual needs and desires are met.



If you’ve found our guide on ways to deliver person-centred care helpful, why not read our previous blog on communication aids for dementia?



Alternatively, please contact a member of our team for more information about our care services.

9th August

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5 Benefits of Online Volunteering: Opening up a World of Opportunities

Have you taken part in any online volunteering?



With so many opportunities arising for volunteering online, we’re looking into the benefits of online volunteering - from ample socialising opportunities to skill development.



Online Volunteering Instils a Sense of Purpose



One of the many benefits of online volunteering is that it can instil a sense of purpose. Particularly over the past year when we were isolated at home, online volunteering opened up a world of possibilities and interactions that you may not have had the chance to access before.



Being able to participate in online volunteering helps you to feel a part of something big and get involved in the community, and you’ll feel good for helping to make a difference.



Online Volunteering Offers a Chance to Connect



Another of the benefits of online volunteering is that it offers you the chance to meet new people online and connect with like-minded individuals.



This can help to reduce loneliness by providing you with plenty of opportunities to interact with people, as well as rallying a sense of community when completing a project together.



Why not look at ways you could come together - perhaps you could organise an online raffle to raise money for your local area?



Online Volunteering is Flexible



Online volunteering can offer you flexibility when you participate, since you don't necessarily have to leave the house. This means that you may be able to volunteer when you haven’t previously been able to because you can work around other commitments.



The convenience of volunteering from home means that you may be able to do much more for your chosen project or group, and won’t have to worry about transport, costs or timings.



Online Volunteering Can Help to Broaden Your Skill Set



Volunteering online can help you to improve your computer skills, which can then benefit other areas of your life.



Being able to efficiently use a computer for all your volunteering can boost your confidence, and as these skills are transferable you can use them in other aspects of your life, such as getting a new job or doing an online course.



You may improve your skills on online polls, social media platforms, spreadsheets, or emails; all of these can be extremely useful in everyday life or in your line of work.



Online Volunteering Can Help You to Feel Good



Helping others and volunteering your time can help you to feel good about yourself, and boost your mood.



Having regular interactions, doing something useful and making a difference in people’s lives can all contribute to improving your mental health and helping you to feel good.



Volunteering online can encourage you to feel proud of yourself for the important work you’re doing, and you’ll feel accomplished when your efforts come to fruition.



If you’ve enjoyed reading about the benefits of online volunteering, why not read our previous blog on selfless acts to boost camaraderie?



If you’d like more information about Wellbeing Care, please contact a member of our team.

4th August

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5 Healthy Breakfast Ideas for Seniors | Wellbeing Care

Keen to discover some inspiration for breakfast ideas for seniors?



Breakfast is an important meal as it helps to set you in good stead for the day. Having a fresh, healthy breakfast can help to boost your energy levels and maximise your cognitive abilities.



From avocado on toast to wholesome porridge, we’re taking a look at our top 5 healthy breakfast ideas for seniors:



Breakfast Ideas for Seniors: Poached Eggs and Avocado on Toast



Avocado is a fantastic source of fibre and is packed full of nutrients. The low-carb fruit is also high in ‘monounsaturated fats’, which are essential for maintaining good cholesterol levels. Avocado is classed as a superfood, and is incredibly versatile.



Why not try crushed avocado on seeded, multigrain bread for a healthy breakfast dish? You could add chilli flakes and lime juice for a zingy start to your day.



Poached eggs are full of protein and are a great addition to your avocado on toast; you could even add a handful of spinach or mushrooms for an extra boost of goodness. Why not try a gentle workout, too, for the ultimate health kick?



Fruit Salad With Natural Yoghurt



Fruits are full of vitamins and minerals, making them an ideal breakfast option. They’re versatile, too, so you can adapt them in almost any way you like.



You could try a tropical fruit salad by dicing mango, kiwi, bananas and pineapple, and then balancing the acidity with a generous spoonful of protein-rich natural yoghurt. Given their high nutritional value, fruits can help to improve your heart health, cognitive function, muscle and bone health and boost your immune system.



We recommend adding pomegranate seeds to your morning fruit salad for an extra burst of delicious goodness. The sweet seeds add not only a bright colour to your dish, but they’re also loaded with antioxidants and vitamins, which helps your body by reducing your blood pressure and improving your heart health.



Breakfast Ideas for Seniors: Overnight Oats With Your Choice of Toppings



Overnight oats are a popular healthy breakfast dish; they’re easy to prepare, delicious and packed full of goodness. You’ll enjoy a lasting feeling of fullness, too, since the high fibre content of oats stimulates the release of slow-releasing energy when consumed.



To make overnight oats, simply spoon some oats into a jar (usually 1/2 cup of oats per portion), and soak them overnight in the fridge with ½ cup of milk and/or natural yoghurt. You could mix in a spoonful of peanut butter, too, or a cup of berries to enhance the flavour and nutritional content.



The following morning, remove your oats from the fridge and finish with your choice of toppings. Why not try a drizzle of honey and a handful of mixed berries for a healthy sweet treat?



Here is an easy recipe for delicious overnight oats.



Breakfast Ideas for Seniors: Smoothie Bowls



Smoothie bowls are as simple as they sound: simply whizz up a smoothie, but serve it in a bowl with toppings of your choice! Smoothie bowls do tend to be a little thicker in consistency, though, so be sure to add enough thickening agents so that you can easily eat it with a spoon. Yoghurts and frozen bananas are great thickeners, and provide an extra bit of flavour, too.



We like this spinach and avocado smoothie bowl, which is packed full of vitamins and antioxidants.



You can top with toasted granola, berries and chia seeds to increase your fibre intake and add a little more substance.



Breakfast Ideas for Seniors: Simple Porridge



Porridge is an easy and delicious way to start your day. It’s light enough to leave you feeling comfortable, whilst being filling enough to keep your hunger at bay until lunchtime.



Simply add a ½ cup of oats to 1 cup of milk, and stir over a low/medium heat until it thickens. To serve, you could add a drizzle of honey or a dollop of jam to sweeten it slightly, or you could add berries or banana to change up the texture and flavour.



As porridge oats are a complex carbohydrate, they release energy slowly to help you get through the morning.



At Wellbeing Care, we’re passionate about ensuring our residents enjoy healthy, wholesome diets. If you’d like to know more about our services, please contact a member of our team.



Alternatively, if you’ve enjoyed reading about our healthy breakfast ideas for seniors, why not read our previous blog on hydration and nutrition?

2nd September

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The Importance of Taking Photos and How to Make the Most of Them

This week, we’re looking at the importance of taking photos, and how you can make the most of them.



From scrapbooking to storytelling, photos are wonderful keepsakes of the memories made by you and your loved ones.



Here at Wellbeing Care, we’re looking at the importance of taking photos:



What is the Importance of Taking Photos?



Taking photos is important for preserving the memories made with your loved ones. Photographs can be set-up to mark an important occasion, or candid as you capture a special moment in time.



You may take photos of houses you’ve lived in, places you’ve visited, people you’ve just met and people you love.



As you get older, you realise that sometimes people move away, move on, or even pass away - and often, photographs can provide comfort in these difficult times.



Here at Wellbeing Care, we take plenty of photos; they serve as wonderful keepsakes for our residents and their families. Check out our social media to take a look.



The Importance of Taking Photos: How Can You Make the Most of Your Photos?



You may want to make multiple copies of your favourite photos, so you can share them with your friends and family. You could also have some framed, or slotted into precious family photo albums.



Having photographs of your loved ones around the home can help make a house feel more homely - and will put a smile on your face every time you walk past them.



It’s important for our residents to have their precious memories dotted around our care homes, as this can help them to feel more comfortable and at ease - particularly if they’re new or are living with dementia.



The Importance of Taking Photos: Why are Photo Albums Beneficial?



Pulling out old photo albums and going through them can be a wonderful activity to enjoy alone or with loved ones; it gives you the opportunity to be instantly transported back to that time.



For our residents living with dementia, this can help to hone their memory and induce feelings of happiness and nostalgia. Sharing this experience with others can be special, too - and within a care home setting, it can be a wonderful opportunity for residents to offer insight into their lives.



The Importance of Taking Photos: How Can Scrapbooking Help Those Living With Dementia?



Scrapbooking is a great way to get our residents’ creative juices flowing. It also helps to improve their motor skills as they cut and stick photos, before writing captions for each memory. It can also encourage storytelling as they explain the relevance of each photo.



As time passes, the scrapbook will serve as a treasure that offers wonderful memories to savour, and can eventually be passed onto family members.



So, remember to continue taking photos - and then frame them, share them, or scrapbook them.



If your loved one is living with dementia, why not read our previous blog on the effects of Sundowners Syndrome?



Alternatively, please contact a member of our team for more information about our Wellbeing Care services.

26th August

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What is Sundowners Syndrome? | Exploring the Effects of Sundowning

Do you find that your loved one who is living with dementia often deteriorates towards the end of the day?



They may be experiencing ‘sundowning’ - a term coined to describe the effects of a person living with dementia as the sun sets and evening draws in.



Here at Wellbeing Care, we’re exploring the possible causes and symptoms as we ask the question, ‘what is Sundowners Syndrome?’



What is Sundowners Syndrome?



The term sundowning describes how a person living with dementia often becomes increasingly more irritable as the day progresses. They may begin to find conversations or tasks more difficult, and their behaviours may begin to regress as their mood deteriorates.



This can be particularly worrisome for family members, particularly if there have been signs of improvement or cognitive stability earlier in the day. The concept of Sundowner Syndrome relates to the idea that tiredness can creep in and affect the person living with dementia drastically.



Many people find that as they near their bedtime, they may not function quite so well. Their body and brain are entering a shutdown state ready for slumber, and so their cognitive abilities become less sharp. This is a perfectly normal response to our bodies preparing for rest and is caused by a reduction in dopamine levels and an increase in melatonin production, but it can have a heavier and more negative effect on someone who is living with dementia.



This is because their bodies don’t produce as much melatonin, leading to disrupted sleep patterns and restlessness. Also, because their cognitive capabilities are already in decline and they’re already a bit hazy, the period where their brains then start to shut down for bed can be far more noticeable and, often, distressing. They’re already in a state of confusion, and so tiredness can amplify this and cause them to perhaps become more forgetful and misbehave or lash out.



How to Reduce the Effects of Sundowners Syndrome



Whilst this is an unpleasant situation for the person living with dementia and their loved ones, there are some helpful tools to help reduce the effects, and limit the period they go on for. We do recommend that you also speak to your loved one’s healthcare provider for further advice and treatment options to help ease the sundowning effects.



Try to reduce or omit their caffeine intake. Caffeine is a brain stimulant and can affect the body’s internal body clock. Switching to decaffeinated drinks or herbal teas can help to regulate their sleep patterns and help them feel calm before bed.



A consistent sleep routine is essential; try to keep a set time for bed and waking up, so they’re not out of sync each day. The same applies to napping, but this can be a difficult balance to strike. The person living with dementia should nap if they feel tired, as overtiredness can lead to irritability. However, over napping can then interrupt their sleep at bedtime, and so finding a napping schedule that works for them is key.



A comfortable room can help them to feel relaxed. Try to use neutral tones in the bedroom to prevent them from feeling stimulated at nighttime.



Try to keep their daily routine as consistent and simple as possible to help with familiarity and comfort. However, they should also be encouraged to increase their daily exercise and activity levels, as this can promote a need for sleep.



If your loved one is living with dementia and you’re experiencing sundowning, please feel free to contact a member of our team. We’ve had extensive dementia training and would be happy to help you in any way we can. We can also help you explore our care service options.



Alternatively, you may find our previous blog on dementia communication helpful.

19th August

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Wellbeing Care Covid-19 Letter to family members and colleagues

Dear family members and colleagues,

Thank you for your continued support and patience throughout what has been an incredibly difficult time for us all.

As ever, the health, safety and wellbeing of our residents and colleagues are always our top priorities. We have therefore continued to implement and adhere to rigorous health and safety practices across our homes.

As such, we have continued to wear full PPE to ensure that the safety of our residents, staff and visitors is maximised at all times.

For comprehensive information about the coronavirus itself, please visit either the Gov.UK or NHS websites or if you are concerned you or someone you are in contact with has coronavirus call 111.

Visiting our Care Home

At Wellbeing Care, it is important to us that our residents see their families and friends as much as possible, without ever compromising their health and safety.

Now that visiting restrictions are eased, we’re pleased to announce that there is no limit on the number of ‘named visitors’ that a single resident can have, and no nationally set limit on the number of visitors in a single day.

We would like to stress, however, that the safety of our residents is paramount; so we ask that you take an at-home lateral flow test in advance of your visit. Additionally, we request that you wear the appropriate PPE on arrival (please contact a member of our team for more details).

Please do not attempt to arrange a visit to our care home for any reason if you currently feel unwell, particularly if you have a cough, a fever or high temperature, or have shortness of breath, or if you have been in contact with someone who may have coronavirus.

How to safely visit a care home

If you are making an essential visit to a care home, it is important that you do so safely and in a way that minimises the risk of infection to our residents and staff. Please consider the following before, during and after visiting our care home:

Hand washing

It is important that you wash your hands thoroughly before you visit the care home, and regularly whilst you are at the home. Please make sure you wash your hands for a minimum of 20 seconds, using either hot water and soap or 60% alcohol sanitiser gel. The NHS has a video guide to effective handwashing here. Additional handwashing stations have been set up at our homes to help visitors wash their hands regularly.

Coughs and sneezes

We understand there are many reasons why someone may cough or sneeze. However, whilst visiting a care home please make sure you have a tissue on you at all times so that you can catch a cough or sneeze. Please then immediately dispose of the tissue in the bin. Remember - Catch it. Bin it. Kill it.

Day Care

Due to the current coronavirus outbreak, Wellbeing Care has taken the decision to temporarily suspend activities at Wellbeing Day Centre from Monday 23rd March.

This is not a decision that has been taken lightly, but we must do everything we can to protect the health and safety of all the people we care for, including our Day Care service users, and our Colleagues. Government guidance on social distancing also advises people aged 70 or older to be particularly stringent in following social distancing measures.

We have informed all of our current Day Care Service Users and provided information to support decisions about alternative care arrangements at this time.

Protecting our Residents and Colleagues

Please be assured that Wellbeing Care is treating this matter with the appropriate seriousness and comprehensive contingency plans are in place in the event of a coronavirus outbreak at a home.

In response to the growing UK coronavirus outbreak, we have created a dedicated steering group. Led by our Director, Operations Manager and Service Managers. This group includes ideas from across the business to review and develop plans, reflecting the situation.

The Wellbeing Care steering group has taken appropriate steps to secure the supplies, establish policies and protocols in the event of an outbreak in a home, and develop plans to ensure Wellbeing Care homes can continue to provide premium care during this time. This way, residents entrusted in our care remain safe and their needs well looked after.

Home managers and staff are aware of the contingency and have been really positive to help prevent the spread of infection. This includes establishing hand washing stations in the reception areas of all homes, installing additional prominent signage about handwashing, and completing the infection control.

Admissions

We are continuing to admit new residents where possible and appropriate, to help ease the pressure on the local NHS and the wider system. We will do all we can to help the local health and Adult Social Care (ASC) teams and the people who need care at this time. Please note we may request a remote assessment to reflect the current situation. Should you wish to make an enquiry, please contact the care home directly.

Further Information

Official coronavirus (Covid-19) information about the coronavirus itself, or if you are concerned you or someone you are in contact with has coronavirus, please visit either the Gov.UK or NHS websites.

For anyone connected to a Wellbeing Care home or service, please call the Home Manager at your local home for more information.

Phone numbers for all homes are listed on the individual home pages.

19th August

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5 Highly Effective Ways to Deliver Person-Centred Care

How can you deliver person-centred care effectively?



Person-centred care ensures that care recipients are treated with dignity and respect at all times; something we value highly here at Wellbeing Care.



This week, we’re looking at the different ways to deliver person-centred care:



Ways to Deliver Person Centred Care: Listen to the Care Recipient



Listening is a vital tool you can use to ensure that you’re respecting your care recipient and helping them feel validated.



Have conversations with them and ask them how they’re feeling, what they’re looking forward to, what they want - but, most importantly, listen to their answers. Take into account their thoughts and feelings and respect their wishes.



This is important in person-centred care because you can then adjust your care plan for the day accordingly. For example, they may be feeling tired, and so you can rearrange your activities and have a quieter, more restful day.



Ways to Deliver Person-Centred Care: Respect Their Values



Your care recipient may have differing opinions, values, beliefs, culture, religion or preferences to you. This can sometimes lead to feelings of frustration, but it’s important to respect their views and accommodate them wherever possible.



This can help them to feel validated and respected, and able to live their life in the way they would have previously. This doesn’t need to compromise your own views in any way, but it might be worth looking at how you can accommodate both of your values in day-to-day care.



Enable Them to Enjoy Life



Requiring care doesn’t have to stop your care recipient from being able to enjoy life. They can still have a fun and fulfilling social life, where they can interact with others, take part in activities and discover new hobbies and interests.



As a carer delivering person-centred care, you can enable them to achieve this by organising activities, excursions and meetings with other people, such as at memory cafes or day centres.



Actively encouraging your care recipient to get involved and take part in activities can help them to build new and meaningful relationships with others and improve their overall quality of life.



Get to Know Them



Getting to know your care recipient fully can help you to understand who they are as a person and forge a more meaningful relationship with them. It can also help you to plan their care and activities as you’ll have a better understanding of their likes and dislikes.



For example, it can be beneficial to know about their childhood and family, previous jobs, schooling and hobbies. This can help you get to know them better and help to prompt interesting conversations.



Accommodate Their Independence



Your care recipient will likely want to retain as much of their independence as possible, so it can be beneficial to look at how you can accommodate this.



From sourcing equipment to make daily living more comfortable and accessible, to including them in their care plan, it’s important for them to have a say and feel able to do what they can for themselves.



Their family and loved ones may also want to be involved in the planning of their care, and so it’s vital that you take their ideas and opinions into account and try to accommodate them where possible.



At Wellbeing Care, adhering to a person-centred approach is integral within our services. As a result, the care plans we deliver aim to focus not only on medical requirements but also on emotional needs. On a day-to-day basis, this involves actively involving our residents in decisions made about their care as we endeavour to ensure that individual needs and desires are met.



If you’ve found our guide on ways to deliver person-centred care helpful, why not read our previous blog on communication aids for dementia?



Alternatively, please contact a member of our team for more information about our care services.

9th August

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5 Benefits of Online Volunteering: Opening up a World of Opportunities

Have you taken part in any online volunteering?



With so many opportunities arising for volunteering online, we’re looking into the benefits of online volunteering - from ample socialising opportunities to skill development.



Online Volunteering Instils a Sense of Purpose



One of the many benefits of online volunteering is that it can instil a sense of purpose. Particularly over the past year when we were isolated at home, online volunteering opened up a world of possibilities and interactions that you may not have had the chance to access before.



Being able to participate in online volunteering helps you to feel a part of something big and get involved in the community, and you’ll feel good for helping to make a difference.



Online Volunteering Offers a Chance to Connect



Another of the benefits of online volunteering is that it offers you the chance to meet new people online and connect with like-minded individuals.



This can help to reduce loneliness by providing you with plenty of opportunities to interact with people, as well as rallying a sense of community when completing a project together.



Why not look at ways you could come together - perhaps you could organise an online raffle to raise money for your local area?



Online Volunteering is Flexible



Online volunteering can offer you flexibility when you participate, since you don't necessarily have to leave the house. This means that you may be able to volunteer when you haven’t previously been able to because you can work around other commitments.



The convenience of volunteering from home means that you may be able to do much more for your chosen project or group, and won’t have to worry about transport, costs or timings.



Online Volunteering Can Help to Broaden Your Skill Set



Volunteering online can help you to improve your computer skills, which can then benefit other areas of your life.



Being able to efficiently use a computer for all your volunteering can boost your confidence, and as these skills are transferable you can use them in other aspects of your life, such as getting a new job or doing an online course.



You may improve your skills on online polls, social media platforms, spreadsheets, or emails; all of these can be extremely useful in everyday life or in your line of work.



Online Volunteering Can Help You to Feel Good



Helping others and volunteering your time can help you to feel good about yourself, and boost your mood.



Having regular interactions, doing something useful and making a difference in people’s lives can all contribute to improving your mental health and helping you to feel good.



Volunteering online can encourage you to feel proud of yourself for the important work you’re doing, and you’ll feel accomplished when your efforts come to fruition.



If you’ve enjoyed reading about the benefits of online volunteering, why not read our previous blog on selfless acts to boost camaraderie?



If you’d like more information about Wellbeing Care, please contact a member of our team.

4th August