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News

With so much going on in our homes, it can be difficult to keep up! That’s why we regularly update this news page with our latest goings-on at Wellbeing Care in Oulton Broad, Beccles and Irchester so you can check back and find out what we’ve been up to.

Follow us on Facebook and Twitter too to be the first to know about all sorts, including our upcoming events, activities, birthday celebrations and team news.

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Reminiscence Therapy for Dementia | 4 Memory-Enhancing Activities

What is reminiscence therapy for dementia?

Reminiscence therapy helps those living with dementia improve or maintain their memory. It involves using a variety of tools and objects to discuss meaningful events and experiences from a person’s past. This can help to improve their wellbeing and evoke their memories.

This week, we’re exploring the best activities for successful reminiscence therapy for dementia:





Reminiscence Therapy for Dementia: Sensory Activities



Focusing on the senses is a great way to help those living with dementia conjure up memories from the past. We often associate important memories with our senses. For example, the smell of apple pie might transport you back to eating pudding at your grandparents house as a child. Similarly, a particular piece of music might remind you of your wedding day.

There are a range of activities that you could try to concentrate on stimulating the senses. These include listening to stories and looking at videos, or you could try baking for touch, smell and taste.

Try to plan activities that allow your loved one to explore each of their senses. You can then use gentle prompts to encourage them to talk about their feelings, memories and ideas.





Reminiscence Therapy for Dementia: Listen to Music



Music is an important part of dementia therapy, as it can help residents to feel calm and relaxed. It can also spark recognition, encouraging them to think about their past and even sing along or dance.

We often associate music with memories. Though your loved one may not be able to recall specific details, it may reignite strong feelings or emotions which can promote feelings of happiness. Sing along with them, encourage them to dance or sway, or give them a small instrument to join in with. This can help them fully immerse themselves in the moment and simply have fun, providing them with the opportunity to recall happy memories.





Look Through Old Photographs



Photographs are a great prop to encourage conversations and evoke memories. Using pictures of the person living with dementia, their family, friends and events from their childhood is a great way to help stimulate their cognitive function. This can help them remember things about themselves and their lives.

They may not remember whole events or specific details, but they may remember how they were feeling at the time, which can provide a sense of comfort and happiness.

You may find it beneficial to put together a scrapbook (in chronological order, if possible) with photos, tickets and captions. This can help to guide your loved one through the story of their life. Try to get input from as many people as possible to help create a full picture for your loved one. They can then help you stick the pictures into the book and you talk about that time of their life as you go.





Reminiscence Therapy for Dementia: Get Creative

Art is a soothing activity for those living with dementia as it’s often done in a calming environment.

It provides a creative outlet for your loved one’s thoughts, feelings and emotions, which can encourage them to open up about their feelings and create opportunities for conversations.

You can ask your loved one about painting as a child and create links between the art they’re doing now and their past, such as by making collages with old photographs or drawing a family portrait. This can encourage them to remember small details about their childhoods, such as whether they had a family pet or who their best friend was.

If they successfully remember and draw something from their past, you could then label it and use it as a prompt in later conversations.

If you’ve found our blog on reminiscence therapy for dementia helpful, why not read our previous post to discover ways to cope with an early diagnosis of dementia?

Alternatively, please contact a member of our team to find out more about our care services.

11th May

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Raising Money: How We’re Spending the Proceeds From Our Easter Raffle

Here at The Dell, we’re celebrating our successful Easter raffle, organised by our very own Daphne Graves, as a way of raising money for our care home.

Daphne is our clinical lead here at The Dell, where her role is to coordinate and oversee the day-to-day running of our home. She wanted to raise funds to make some home improvements and put a smile on our residents' faces.

In this blog post, we’re sharing details of the Easter raffle and what we’ll be spending the proceeds on…

Raising Money: Our Easter Raffle



Daphne organised the raffle to help raise funds towards improvements for our Suffolk-based care home, The Dell.

She arranged an array of wonderful prizes, securing 45 in total. These included a Dove toiletry hamper, a homemade Easter bunny with an egg, and a selection of indulgent chocolates.

Our new deputy manager, Simon Fletcher, took home the star prize - an incredible scuba-diving experience.

Raising Money: How we’re Spending the Proceeds



The raffle raised an incredible £132. We’re going to be spending the money on refurbishing our garden. Our aim is to give our residents a relaxing, comfortable and beautiful outdoor space where they can spend time during the warmer months.

We’re going to buy an array of vibrant plants to help brighten up the garden and give it a refreshing new lease of life. We'll then continue to raise money in the coming months to update the garden furniture.

The Importance of Spending Time Outdoors



It’s important to us to update our garden and create an inviting outdoor space for our residents. Spending time outdoors is beneficial in many ways, as being amongst nature can help to reduce stress and anxiety. It can also encourage social activities and games, whilst providing our residents with a healthy dose of vitamin D.

Gardening is also beneficial as it can encourage our residents to keep moving their body. Maintaining plants can also provide them with a sense of purpose.

Following a tough two years in and out of lockdown, the new garden will be a welcome change for our residents. It’ll be a safe and inviting space for them to socialise with each other and their visitors.

Raising Money for Our Garden



We’re grateful to Daphne for organising the Easter raffle and raising money to help improve our garden area. She did a brilliant job of planning and executing the raffle and we’re excited to put the money to good use.

Daphne said: “I launched the Easter raffle as I thought it was a fantastic way to raise money for refurbishments at The Dell. I thought it would also boost resident morale and wellbeing.

"Our care team, residents’ family members and friends have all been so generous with their donations. We thank them for their part in enabling us to provide a nice and much-needed surprise for the residents.

“We look forward to using the funds raised to buy some furniture and plants to brighten up the home’s gardens this summer. We often host charitable events throughout the year to go towards amenities, but our current goal is to improve our outdoor offering. We want to ensure that our garden is a beautiful, cosy place for our residents to enjoy.”

If you’d like to know more about our Wellbeing Care homes, please contact a member of our team.

Alternatively, why not read our previous blog to find out how to cope with an early diagnosis of dementia?

9th May

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How to Cope With an Early Diagnosis of Dementia

Has your loved one received an early diagnosis of dementia? You may be feeling worried and anxious; these are normal feelings to have, and are part of the process of accepting and understanding your loved one’s diagnosis.



Here, we’re sharing ways in which you can cope with an early diagnosis of dementia:



An Early Diagnosis of Dementia: Professional Intervention



Early signs of dementia can include forgetfulness and difficulties finding the right words. Your loved one may also struggle with usual patterns of thought. They may experience changes in personality, such as irrational, agitated or uneasy behaviour. You may also find that they lack the ability to carry out basic tasks and functions in their day-to-day life.



When you first spot these signs, it may feel quite daunting. It’s important to seek an official diagnosis and get professional help as soon as possible. Your loved one’s GP will arrange some tests to get the early diagnosis of dementia, and will then help you with the next steps and what this means.



The GP can talk you through the different options available, such as home care, dementia care homes and other forms of support. These services will help to relieve the pressure and ensure that your loved one is safe, happy and cared for.



Learning About Dementia



When you’re faced with an unexpected early diagnosis of dementia, you may be feeling unsure of exactly what that means. Often, people understand that dementia leads to memory loss, but there is much more to it. It’s important that you take the time to learn about dementia. Understanding the causes, symptoms, and progression of dementia can help you come to terms with the diagnosis.



Knowledge is key when it comes to coping, as you’ll need to prepare for changes and developments in your loved one’s personality and behaviour.



It can also be helpful to learn how to interact with someone who’s living with dementia. This can be learning new ways to interact or discovering new activities that can help to improve their cognitive functioning.



An Early Diagnosis of Dementia: The Adjustment Period



It can often feel frustrating when your communication barriers start to break down with your loved one. Try to remain calm and composed as you navigate your way through finding new ways to interact.



This is new territory for you both, so there will be plenty of adjusting to do as you come to terms with the diagnosis.



During this time, try to remember that your loved one could be feeling confused and anxious. They'll need plenty of love and support to help them feel safe. It might be a good idea to ask for help from other family members to reduce the pressure and make things easier for you.



Here at Wellbeing Care, we specialise in dementia care. We’d be happy to talk to you about our available care services to help you find the right help for your loved one. Please contact a member of our team for more information.



Alternatively, why not read our previous blog to discover the effects of sundowning?

6th April

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Our Care Homes in Suffolk: What to Expect When Your Loved One Moves into Care

Is your loved one moving into care?



Here at Wellbeing Care, we understand the difficulties you may be experiencing when coming to terms with your loved one moving away from home.



Here, we’re sharing what you can expect for your loved one as they move into one of our care homes in Suffolk:



Care Homes in Suffolk: Supporting the Transition Period



When your loved one first moves into care, there’s often an adjustment period as you both get used to your new ways of life. You’ll be learning to adapt to them being away, and they’ll be adjusting to a new environment.



This can often feel daunting and you may experience a mixture of conflicting emotions. This is completely normal, and once you both get used to them living in care, you’ll focus more on the positive aspects of the move.



We’ll support you and your loved one however we can during this transition. We often buddy our new residents up so they have a friend they can lean on in the first few weeks. We’ll encourage them to take part in activities to help them integrate into our community.



We’ll also ask that you help them pack important items, such as photographs and ornaments, that can help them feel more at home.



Care Homes in Suffolk: Your Loved One Will Receive Expert Care



When your loved one moves into one of our care homes in Suffolk, you can expect them to receive an unparalleled level of care.



Specialising in dementia care, we help your loved one live an independent life that’s within their capabilities.



We coordinate activities that will help to improve your loved one’s cognitive function, memory, motor skills, and comprehension. These activities range from baking and crafts to exercise classes and day trips. We try to encourage them to take part in the sessions to help improve their emotional and physical well-being.



We also provide exceptional care for those living with dementia. We take the time to learn different methods of communication which can help us to understand them and vice versa.



Here at Wellbeing Care, we also create bespoke care plans for each resident. This will reassure you that your loved one is receiving the very best person-centred care.



Care Homes in Suffolk: Understanding it’s For the Best



It can still feel unsettling to move your loved one into care, despite knowing they’re with capable and loving hands.



Your loved one can enjoy a fulfilling life at Wellbeing Care, with round-the-clock care and support should they need it. They’ll be in a safe and secure environment with like-minded individuals where they can have fun.



It’s not only your loved one who will benefit from moving into care. When you’re no longer their main carer, you can focus on spending more quality time with them and enjoying their company. This can help to improve your mental health and give you the freedom to focus on yourself a little bit more.



We have two care homes in Suffolk - The Dell and St George’s. If you’d like more information about either home, please contact a dedicated member of our team.



Alternatively, why not read our previous blog to find out more about person-centred care for dementia?

6th April

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Valentine’s Day Traditions | How Our Care Homes Celebrated

What are your Valentine’s Day traditions?



Here, we’re taking a look at what love means to different people, and sharing all the wonderful activities our residents took part in to celebrate Valentine’s Day:



Valentine’s Day Traditions and Values



Many people choose to spend quality time with their partner or spouse for their Valentine’s Day traditions, exchanging gifts and cards and enjoying a meal together.



Some people use the day to celebrate their friendships or let their family members know how much they love them, whilst others might use the day to indulge in self-care.



Here at Wellbeing Care, our residents used the time to celebrate all the love they’ve given and received, both in the past and at present. They reflected on how they used to celebrate when they were younger whilst making cards and decorating their craft pieces.



Valentine’s Day Traditions: Arts and Crafts



Many of our residents got creative this Valentine’s Day, making a variety of love-themed decorations and cards. They decorated small glass jars with glitter and gems to create beautiful, eye-catching candle holders.



They also used red, white and pink tissue paper to decorate paper hearts, which they then attached to a piece of string to hang up around the room. Whilst making Valentine’s cards, our residents used a variety of paints and stamps to create thoughtful keepsakes.



Craft activities are great for allowing our residents to express themselves, whilst also providing them with the opportunity to unwind and relax. The calming nature of arts and crafts can help to reduce stress and anxiety, whilst increasing feelings of happiness.



Creative activities also offer the chance for residents to spend quality time together and have meaningful conversations. Whilst getting creative, our residents reminisced about their Valentine’s Day traditions from days gone by, sharing their experiences and memories with one another.



Baking Valentine’s Day Treats



Residents across our homes always enjoy cooking and baking activities. These are great for improving cognitive skills and memory, as our residents have to measure ingredients, trust their judgement, and follow instructions carefully.



For Valentine’s Day, they baked a batch of themed cupcakes. They drizzled the cakes with white icing and then sprinkled on edible love heart confetti. The finished look was very effective, and our residents enjoyed tucking into them.



They also had lots of fun dipping strawberries into chocolate - which they thoroughly enjoyed alongside some delicious love heart shortbread and meringues made by our wonderful kitchen staff.



Valentine’s Day Traditions: Words of Advice



To finish off the celebrations, we asked our residents to share some words of wisdom about love. We had some beautiful answers, including, ‘always be there for each other,’ which were written down on paper hearts. We then threaded the hearts onto some string to make a decorative garland, which we hung up in our main lounge.



This was a lovely activity that allowed our residents to reflect on what love means to them.



If you’ve enjoyed our blog about our Valentine’s Day traditions, why not read our previous article on making the most of your retirement?



Alternatively, for more information about our care services, please contact a dedicated member of our team.

28th February

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The Benefits of Music Therapy | 6 Positive Ways Music Can Help Improve Your Mood

What are the benefits of music therapy?



Music therapy is a wonderful activity that our residents regularly enjoy. From singing to playing instruments, our music sessions never fail to create a warm, positive atmosphere throughout our home.



This week, we’re taking a look at the benefits of music therapy:





The Benefits of Music Therapy: It Makes You Feel Good



One of the benefits of music therapy is the increased production of dopamine - the hormone responsible for reducing feelings of stress and anxiety and elevating your mood.



Listening, singing along, playing or dancing to music can help to boost your mood. The stress-reducing effects of music therapy help to lower cortisol levels, inducing feelings of happiness and relaxation.



At Wellbeing Care, our residents regularly gather together for a fun music session full of laughs and positive energy.



Music Encourages You to Be More Active



Music encourages dancing - whether that's tapping in time with a beat or a waltz around the room.



Dancing and playing instruments can help to build muscle strength and improve balance, whilst also enhancing motor skills and coordination.



The Benefits of Music Therapy: Improved Memory Retention



Music can enhance areas of the brain associated with memory. Whether you remember lyrics or learn a dance routine, music provides stimulation to the brain and can help to form new neural pathways. You may also hear a song that's significant to you, bringing past memories to the forefront of your mind.



You may remember a particularly special time in your life, perhaps triggered by a certain song, and relive the emotions you felt at that time.



The Benefits of Music Therapy: Helping to Induce Sleep



Music can aid a better quality of sleep by encouraging relaxation and reducing stress. It can help you to switch off your thoughts, enabling you to fall asleep quicker and have a more restful night’s sleep.



Try listening to a gentle piece of music when you get into bed to reap the benefits of its calming effect. You could use an app, such as Calm, to play a relaxing, instrumental song on a timer. You can adjust the settings to ensure the music stops when you're asleep, and there is a wide range of styles you can choose from.



Music Therapy Encourages Self-Expression and Creativity



Here at Wellbeing Care, we understand that music is a personal activity and can be enjoyed in many different ways.



Music is a creative art and so it allows people the freedom to express themselves in whichever way they feel comfortable. You may wish, for example, to listen to relaxing classical music whilst in the bath, or an upbeat album to build your energy in preparation for a workout.



The Benefits of Music Therapy: Enhancing Fine Motor Skills



Playing an instrument is a great way to improve fine motor skills. Instruments that require intricate hand movements, such as guitar and piano playing, can help to exercise muscles you might not normally use.



At Wellbeing Care, we use collective rhythm as a guide to help our residents play music together - such as gently playing the drums or tapping a tambourine. This can help to improve memory and coordination.



We’re passionate about encouraging our residents to try a wide range of indoor and outdoor activities. If you’d like some inspiration, why not take a look at our gardening tips for seniors?



Alternatively, please contact a member of our team for more information about our care services.

17th February

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Reminiscence Therapy for Dementia | 4 Memory-Enhancing Activities

What is reminiscence therapy for dementia?

Reminiscence therapy helps those living with dementia improve or maintain their memory. It involves using a variety of tools and objects to discuss meaningful events and experiences from a person’s past. This can help to improve their wellbeing and evoke their memories.

This week, we’re exploring the best activities for successful reminiscence therapy for dementia:





Reminiscence Therapy for Dementia: Sensory Activities



Focusing on the senses is a great way to help those living with dementia conjure up memories from the past. We often associate important memories with our senses. For example, the smell of apple pie might transport you back to eating pudding at your grandparents house as a child. Similarly, a particular piece of music might remind you of your wedding day.

There are a range of activities that you could try to concentrate on stimulating the senses. These include listening to stories and looking at videos, or you could try baking for touch, smell and taste.

Try to plan activities that allow your loved one to explore each of their senses. You can then use gentle prompts to encourage them to talk about their feelings, memories and ideas.





Reminiscence Therapy for Dementia: Listen to Music



Music is an important part of dementia therapy, as it can help residents to feel calm and relaxed. It can also spark recognition, encouraging them to think about their past and even sing along or dance.

We often associate music with memories. Though your loved one may not be able to recall specific details, it may reignite strong feelings or emotions which can promote feelings of happiness. Sing along with them, encourage them to dance or sway, or give them a small instrument to join in with. This can help them fully immerse themselves in the moment and simply have fun, providing them with the opportunity to recall happy memories.





Look Through Old Photographs



Photographs are a great prop to encourage conversations and evoke memories. Using pictures of the person living with dementia, their family, friends and events from their childhood is a great way to help stimulate their cognitive function. This can help them remember things about themselves and their lives.

They may not remember whole events or specific details, but they may remember how they were feeling at the time, which can provide a sense of comfort and happiness.

You may find it beneficial to put together a scrapbook (in chronological order, if possible) with photos, tickets and captions. This can help to guide your loved one through the story of their life. Try to get input from as many people as possible to help create a full picture for your loved one. They can then help you stick the pictures into the book and you talk about that time of their life as you go.





Reminiscence Therapy for Dementia: Get Creative

Art is a soothing activity for those living with dementia as it’s often done in a calming environment.

It provides a creative outlet for your loved one’s thoughts, feelings and emotions, which can encourage them to open up about their feelings and create opportunities for conversations.

You can ask your loved one about painting as a child and create links between the art they’re doing now and their past, such as by making collages with old photographs or drawing a family portrait. This can encourage them to remember small details about their childhoods, such as whether they had a family pet or who their best friend was.

If they successfully remember and draw something from their past, you could then label it and use it as a prompt in later conversations.

If you’ve found our blog on reminiscence therapy for dementia helpful, why not read our previous post to discover ways to cope with an early diagnosis of dementia?

Alternatively, please contact a member of our team to find out more about our care services.

11th May

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Raising Money: How We’re Spending the Proceeds From Our Easter Raffle

Here at The Dell, we’re celebrating our successful Easter raffle, organised by our very own Daphne Graves, as a way of raising money for our care home.

Daphne is our clinical lead here at The Dell, where her role is to coordinate and oversee the day-to-day running of our home. She wanted to raise funds to make some home improvements and put a smile on our residents' faces.

In this blog post, we’re sharing details of the Easter raffle and what we’ll be spending the proceeds on…

Raising Money: Our Easter Raffle



Daphne organised the raffle to help raise funds towards improvements for our Suffolk-based care home, The Dell.

She arranged an array of wonderful prizes, securing 45 in total. These included a Dove toiletry hamper, a homemade Easter bunny with an egg, and a selection of indulgent chocolates.

Our new deputy manager, Simon Fletcher, took home the star prize - an incredible scuba-diving experience.

Raising Money: How we’re Spending the Proceeds



The raffle raised an incredible £132. We’re going to be spending the money on refurbishing our garden. Our aim is to give our residents a relaxing, comfortable and beautiful outdoor space where they can spend time during the warmer months.

We’re going to buy an array of vibrant plants to help brighten up the garden and give it a refreshing new lease of life. We'll then continue to raise money in the coming months to update the garden furniture.

The Importance of Spending Time Outdoors



It’s important to us to update our garden and create an inviting outdoor space for our residents. Spending time outdoors is beneficial in many ways, as being amongst nature can help to reduce stress and anxiety. It can also encourage social activities and games, whilst providing our residents with a healthy dose of vitamin D.

Gardening is also beneficial as it can encourage our residents to keep moving their body. Maintaining plants can also provide them with a sense of purpose.

Following a tough two years in and out of lockdown, the new garden will be a welcome change for our residents. It’ll be a safe and inviting space for them to socialise with each other and their visitors.

Raising Money for Our Garden



We’re grateful to Daphne for organising the Easter raffle and raising money to help improve our garden area. She did a brilliant job of planning and executing the raffle and we’re excited to put the money to good use.

Daphne said: “I launched the Easter raffle as I thought it was a fantastic way to raise money for refurbishments at The Dell. I thought it would also boost resident morale and wellbeing.

"Our care team, residents’ family members and friends have all been so generous with their donations. We thank them for their part in enabling us to provide a nice and much-needed surprise for the residents.

“We look forward to using the funds raised to buy some furniture and plants to brighten up the home’s gardens this summer. We often host charitable events throughout the year to go towards amenities, but our current goal is to improve our outdoor offering. We want to ensure that our garden is a beautiful, cosy place for our residents to enjoy.”

If you’d like to know more about our Wellbeing Care homes, please contact a member of our team.

Alternatively, why not read our previous blog to find out how to cope with an early diagnosis of dementia?

9th May

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How to Cope With an Early Diagnosis of Dementia

Has your loved one received an early diagnosis of dementia? You may be feeling worried and anxious; these are normal feelings to have, and are part of the process of accepting and understanding your loved one’s diagnosis.



Here, we’re sharing ways in which you can cope with an early diagnosis of dementia:



An Early Diagnosis of Dementia: Professional Intervention



Early signs of dementia can include forgetfulness and difficulties finding the right words. Your loved one may also struggle with usual patterns of thought. They may experience changes in personality, such as irrational, agitated or uneasy behaviour. You may also find that they lack the ability to carry out basic tasks and functions in their day-to-day life.



When you first spot these signs, it may feel quite daunting. It’s important to seek an official diagnosis and get professional help as soon as possible. Your loved one’s GP will arrange some tests to get the early diagnosis of dementia, and will then help you with the next steps and what this means.



The GP can talk you through the different options available, such as home care, dementia care homes and other forms of support. These services will help to relieve the pressure and ensure that your loved one is safe, happy and cared for.



Learning About Dementia



When you’re faced with an unexpected early diagnosis of dementia, you may be feeling unsure of exactly what that means. Often, people understand that dementia leads to memory loss, but there is much more to it. It’s important that you take the time to learn about dementia. Understanding the causes, symptoms, and progression of dementia can help you come to terms with the diagnosis.



Knowledge is key when it comes to coping, as you’ll need to prepare for changes and developments in your loved one’s personality and behaviour.



It can also be helpful to learn how to interact with someone who’s living with dementia. This can be learning new ways to interact or discovering new activities that can help to improve their cognitive functioning.



An Early Diagnosis of Dementia: The Adjustment Period



It can often feel frustrating when your communication barriers start to break down with your loved one. Try to remain calm and composed as you navigate your way through finding new ways to interact.



This is new territory for you both, so there will be plenty of adjusting to do as you come to terms with the diagnosis.



During this time, try to remember that your loved one could be feeling confused and anxious. They'll need plenty of love and support to help them feel safe. It might be a good idea to ask for help from other family members to reduce the pressure and make things easier for you.



Here at Wellbeing Care, we specialise in dementia care. We’d be happy to talk to you about our available care services to help you find the right help for your loved one. Please contact a member of our team for more information.



Alternatively, why not read our previous blog to discover the effects of sundowning?

6th April

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Our Care Homes in Suffolk: What to Expect When Your Loved One Moves into Care

Is your loved one moving into care?



Here at Wellbeing Care, we understand the difficulties you may be experiencing when coming to terms with your loved one moving away from home.



Here, we’re sharing what you can expect for your loved one as they move into one of our care homes in Suffolk:



Care Homes in Suffolk: Supporting the Transition Period



When your loved one first moves into care, there’s often an adjustment period as you both get used to your new ways of life. You’ll be learning to adapt to them being away, and they’ll be adjusting to a new environment.



This can often feel daunting and you may experience a mixture of conflicting emotions. This is completely normal, and once you both get used to them living in care, you’ll focus more on the positive aspects of the move.



We’ll support you and your loved one however we can during this transition. We often buddy our new residents up so they have a friend they can lean on in the first few weeks. We’ll encourage them to take part in activities to help them integrate into our community.



We’ll also ask that you help them pack important items, such as photographs and ornaments, that can help them feel more at home.



Care Homes in Suffolk: Your Loved One Will Receive Expert Care



When your loved one moves into one of our care homes in Suffolk, you can expect them to receive an unparalleled level of care.



Specialising in dementia care, we help your loved one live an independent life that’s within their capabilities.



We coordinate activities that will help to improve your loved one’s cognitive function, memory, motor skills, and comprehension. These activities range from baking and crafts to exercise classes and day trips. We try to encourage them to take part in the sessions to help improve their emotional and physical well-being.



We also provide exceptional care for those living with dementia. We take the time to learn different methods of communication which can help us to understand them and vice versa.



Here at Wellbeing Care, we also create bespoke care plans for each resident. This will reassure you that your loved one is receiving the very best person-centred care.



Care Homes in Suffolk: Understanding it’s For the Best



It can still feel unsettling to move your loved one into care, despite knowing they’re with capable and loving hands.



Your loved one can enjoy a fulfilling life at Wellbeing Care, with round-the-clock care and support should they need it. They’ll be in a safe and secure environment with like-minded individuals where they can have fun.



It’s not only your loved one who will benefit from moving into care. When you’re no longer their main carer, you can focus on spending more quality time with them and enjoying their company. This can help to improve your mental health and give you the freedom to focus on yourself a little bit more.



We have two care homes in Suffolk - The Dell and St George’s. If you’d like more information about either home, please contact a dedicated member of our team.



Alternatively, why not read our previous blog to find out more about person-centred care for dementia?

6th April

Image for News item 1340

Valentine’s Day Traditions | How Our Care Homes Celebrated

What are your Valentine’s Day traditions?



Here, we’re taking a look at what love means to different people, and sharing all the wonderful activities our residents took part in to celebrate Valentine’s Day:



Valentine’s Day Traditions and Values



Many people choose to spend quality time with their partner or spouse for their Valentine’s Day traditions, exchanging gifts and cards and enjoying a meal together.



Some people use the day to celebrate their friendships or let their family members know how much they love them, whilst others might use the day to indulge in self-care.



Here at Wellbeing Care, our residents used the time to celebrate all the love they’ve given and received, both in the past and at present. They reflected on how they used to celebrate when they were younger whilst making cards and decorating their craft pieces.



Valentine’s Day Traditions: Arts and Crafts



Many of our residents got creative this Valentine’s Day, making a variety of love-themed decorations and cards. They decorated small glass jars with glitter and gems to create beautiful, eye-catching candle holders.



They also used red, white and pink tissue paper to decorate paper hearts, which they then attached to a piece of string to hang up around the room. Whilst making Valentine’s cards, our residents used a variety of paints and stamps to create thoughtful keepsakes.



Craft activities are great for allowing our residents to express themselves, whilst also providing them with the opportunity to unwind and relax. The calming nature of arts and crafts can help to reduce stress and anxiety, whilst increasing feelings of happiness.



Creative activities also offer the chance for residents to spend quality time together and have meaningful conversations. Whilst getting creative, our residents reminisced about their Valentine’s Day traditions from days gone by, sharing their experiences and memories with one another.



Baking Valentine’s Day Treats



Residents across our homes always enjoy cooking and baking activities. These are great for improving cognitive skills and memory, as our residents have to measure ingredients, trust their judgement, and follow instructions carefully.



For Valentine’s Day, they baked a batch of themed cupcakes. They drizzled the cakes with white icing and then sprinkled on edible love heart confetti. The finished look was very effective, and our residents enjoyed tucking into them.



They also had lots of fun dipping strawberries into chocolate - which they thoroughly enjoyed alongside some delicious love heart shortbread and meringues made by our wonderful kitchen staff.



Valentine’s Day Traditions: Words of Advice



To finish off the celebrations, we asked our residents to share some words of wisdom about love. We had some beautiful answers, including, ‘always be there for each other,’ which were written down on paper hearts. We then threaded the hearts onto some string to make a decorative garland, which we hung up in our main lounge.



This was a lovely activity that allowed our residents to reflect on what love means to them.



If you’ve enjoyed our blog about our Valentine’s Day traditions, why not read our previous article on making the most of your retirement?



Alternatively, for more information about our care services, please contact a dedicated member of our team.

28th February

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The Benefits of Music Therapy | 6 Positive Ways Music Can Help Improve Your Mood

What are the benefits of music therapy?



Music therapy is a wonderful activity that our residents regularly enjoy. From singing to playing instruments, our music sessions never fail to create a warm, positive atmosphere throughout our home.



This week, we’re taking a look at the benefits of music therapy:





The Benefits of Music Therapy: It Makes You Feel Good



One of the benefits of music therapy is the increased production of dopamine - the hormone responsible for reducing feelings of stress and anxiety and elevating your mood.



Listening, singing along, playing or dancing to music can help to boost your mood. The stress-reducing effects of music therapy help to lower cortisol levels, inducing feelings of happiness and relaxation.



At Wellbeing Care, our residents regularly gather together for a fun music session full of laughs and positive energy.



Music Encourages You to Be More Active



Music encourages dancing - whether that's tapping in time with a beat or a waltz around the room.



Dancing and playing instruments can help to build muscle strength and improve balance, whilst also enhancing motor skills and coordination.



The Benefits of Music Therapy: Improved Memory Retention



Music can enhance areas of the brain associated with memory. Whether you remember lyrics or learn a dance routine, music provides stimulation to the brain and can help to form new neural pathways. You may also hear a song that's significant to you, bringing past memories to the forefront of your mind.



You may remember a particularly special time in your life, perhaps triggered by a certain song, and relive the emotions you felt at that time.



The Benefits of Music Therapy: Helping to Induce Sleep



Music can aid a better quality of sleep by encouraging relaxation and reducing stress. It can help you to switch off your thoughts, enabling you to fall asleep quicker and have a more restful night’s sleep.



Try listening to a gentle piece of music when you get into bed to reap the benefits of its calming effect. You could use an app, such as Calm, to play a relaxing, instrumental song on a timer. You can adjust the settings to ensure the music stops when you're asleep, and there is a wide range of styles you can choose from.



Music Therapy Encourages Self-Expression and Creativity



Here at Wellbeing Care, we understand that music is a personal activity and can be enjoyed in many different ways.



Music is a creative art and so it allows people the freedom to express themselves in whichever way they feel comfortable. You may wish, for example, to listen to relaxing classical music whilst in the bath, or an upbeat album to build your energy in preparation for a workout.



The Benefits of Music Therapy: Enhancing Fine Motor Skills



Playing an instrument is a great way to improve fine motor skills. Instruments that require intricate hand movements, such as guitar and piano playing, can help to exercise muscles you might not normally use.



At Wellbeing Care, we use collective rhythm as a guide to help our residents play music together - such as gently playing the drums or tapping a tambourine. This can help to improve memory and coordination.



We’re passionate about encouraging our residents to try a wide range of indoor and outdoor activities. If you’d like some inspiration, why not take a look at our gardening tips for seniors?



Alternatively, please contact a member of our team for more information about our care services.

17th February

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Reminiscence Therapy for Dementia | 4 Memory-Enhancing Activities

What is reminiscence therapy for dementia?

Reminiscence therapy helps those living with dementia improve or maintain their memory. It involves using a variety of tools and objects to discuss meaningful events and experiences from a person’s past. This can help to improve their wellbeing and evoke their memories.

This week, we’re exploring the best activities for successful reminiscence therapy for dementia:





Reminiscence Therapy for Dementia: Sensory Activities



Focusing on the senses is a great way to help those living with dementia conjure up memories from the past. We often associate important memories with our senses. For example, the smell of apple pie might transport you back to eating pudding at your grandparents house as a child. Similarly, a particular piece of music might remind you of your wedding day.

There are a range of activities that you could try to concentrate on stimulating the senses. These include listening to stories and looking at videos, or you could try baking for touch, smell and taste.

Try to plan activities that allow your loved one to explore each of their senses. You can then use gentle prompts to encourage them to talk about their feelings, memories and ideas.





Reminiscence Therapy for Dementia: Listen to Music



Music is an important part of dementia therapy, as it can help residents to feel calm and relaxed. It can also spark recognition, encouraging them to think about their past and even sing along or dance.

We often associate music with memories. Though your loved one may not be able to recall specific details, it may reignite strong feelings or emotions which can promote feelings of happiness. Sing along with them, encourage them to dance or sway, or give them a small instrument to join in with. This can help them fully immerse themselves in the moment and simply have fun, providing them with the opportunity to recall happy memories.





Look Through Old Photographs



Photographs are a great prop to encourage conversations and evoke memories. Using pictures of the person living with dementia, their family, friends and events from their childhood is a great way to help stimulate their cognitive function. This can help them remember things about themselves and their lives.

They may not remember whole events or specific details, but they may remember how they were feeling at the time, which can provide a sense of comfort and happiness.

You may find it beneficial to put together a scrapbook (in chronological order, if possible) with photos, tickets and captions. This can help to guide your loved one through the story of their life. Try to get input from as many people as possible to help create a full picture for your loved one. They can then help you stick the pictures into the book and you talk about that time of their life as you go.





Reminiscence Therapy for Dementia: Get Creative

Art is a soothing activity for those living with dementia as it’s often done in a calming environment.

It provides a creative outlet for your loved one’s thoughts, feelings and emotions, which can encourage them to open up about their feelings and create opportunities for conversations.

You can ask your loved one about painting as a child and create links between the art they’re doing now and their past, such as by making collages with old photographs or drawing a family portrait. This can encourage them to remember small details about their childhoods, such as whether they had a family pet or who their best friend was.

If they successfully remember and draw something from their past, you could then label it and use it as a prompt in later conversations.

If you’ve found our blog on reminiscence therapy for dementia helpful, why not read our previous post to discover ways to cope with an early diagnosis of dementia?

Alternatively, please contact a member of our team to find out more about our care services.

11th May

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Raising Money: How We’re Spending the Proceeds From Our Easter Raffle

Here at The Dell, we’re celebrating our successful Easter raffle, organised by our very own Daphne Graves, as a way of raising money for our care home.

Daphne is our clinical lead here at The Dell, where her role is to coordinate and oversee the day-to-day running of our home. She wanted to raise funds to make some home improvements and put a smile on our residents' faces.

In this blog post, we’re sharing details of the Easter raffle and what we’ll be spending the proceeds on…

Raising Money: Our Easter Raffle



Daphne organised the raffle to help raise funds towards improvements for our Suffolk-based care home, The Dell.

She arranged an array of wonderful prizes, securing 45 in total. These included a Dove toiletry hamper, a homemade Easter bunny with an egg, and a selection of indulgent chocolates.

Our new deputy manager, Simon Fletcher, took home the star prize - an incredible scuba-diving experience.

Raising Money: How we’re Spending the Proceeds



The raffle raised an incredible £132. We’re going to be spending the money on refurbishing our garden. Our aim is to give our residents a relaxing, comfortable and beautiful outdoor space where they can spend time during the warmer months.

We’re going to buy an array of vibrant plants to help brighten up the garden and give it a refreshing new lease of life. We'll then continue to raise money in the coming months to update the garden furniture.

The Importance of Spending Time Outdoors



It’s important to us to update our garden and create an inviting outdoor space for our residents. Spending time outdoors is beneficial in many ways, as being amongst nature can help to reduce stress and anxiety. It can also encourage social activities and games, whilst providing our residents with a healthy dose of vitamin D.

Gardening is also beneficial as it can encourage our residents to keep moving their body. Maintaining plants can also provide them with a sense of purpose.

Following a tough two years in and out of lockdown, the new garden will be a welcome change for our residents. It’ll be a safe and inviting space for them to socialise with each other and their visitors.

Raising Money for Our Garden



We’re grateful to Daphne for organising the Easter raffle and raising money to help improve our garden area. She did a brilliant job of planning and executing the raffle and we’re excited to put the money to good use.

Daphne said: “I launched the Easter raffle as I thought it was a fantastic way to raise money for refurbishments at The Dell. I thought it would also boost resident morale and wellbeing.

"Our care team, residents’ family members and friends have all been so generous with their donations. We thank them for their part in enabling us to provide a nice and much-needed surprise for the residents.

“We look forward to using the funds raised to buy some furniture and plants to brighten up the home’s gardens this summer. We often host charitable events throughout the year to go towards amenities, but our current goal is to improve our outdoor offering. We want to ensure that our garden is a beautiful, cosy place for our residents to enjoy.”

If you’d like to know more about our Wellbeing Care homes, please contact a member of our team.

Alternatively, why not read our previous blog to find out how to cope with an early diagnosis of dementia?

9th May

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How to Cope With an Early Diagnosis of Dementia

Has your loved one received an early diagnosis of dementia? You may be feeling worried and anxious; these are normal feelings to have, and are part of the process of accepting and understanding your loved one’s diagnosis.



Here, we’re sharing ways in which you can cope with an early diagnosis of dementia:



An Early Diagnosis of Dementia: Professional Intervention



Early signs of dementia can include forgetfulness and difficulties finding the right words. Your loved one may also struggle with usual patterns of thought. They may experience changes in personality, such as irrational, agitated or uneasy behaviour. You may also find that they lack the ability to carry out basic tasks and functions in their day-to-day life.



When you first spot these signs, it may feel quite daunting. It’s important to seek an official diagnosis and get professional help as soon as possible. Your loved one’s GP will arrange some tests to get the early diagnosis of dementia, and will then help you with the next steps and what this means.



The GP can talk you through the different options available, such as home care, dementia care homes and other forms of support. These services will help to relieve the pressure and ensure that your loved one is safe, happy and cared for.



Learning About Dementia



When you’re faced with an unexpected early diagnosis of dementia, you may be feeling unsure of exactly what that means. Often, people understand that dementia leads to memory loss, but there is much more to it. It’s important that you take the time to learn about dementia. Understanding the causes, symptoms, and progression of dementia can help you come to terms with the diagnosis.



Knowledge is key when it comes to coping, as you’ll need to prepare for changes and developments in your loved one’s personality and behaviour.



It can also be helpful to learn how to interact with someone who’s living with dementia. This can be learning new ways to interact or discovering new activities that can help to improve their cognitive functioning.



An Early Diagnosis of Dementia: The Adjustment Period



It can often feel frustrating when your communication barriers start to break down with your loved one. Try to remain calm and composed as you navigate your way through finding new ways to interact.



This is new territory for you both, so there will be plenty of adjusting to do as you come to terms with the diagnosis.



During this time, try to remember that your loved one could be feeling confused and anxious. They'll need plenty of love and support to help them feel safe. It might be a good idea to ask for help from other family members to reduce the pressure and make things easier for you.



Here at Wellbeing Care, we specialise in dementia care. We’d be happy to talk to you about our available care services to help you find the right help for your loved one. Please contact a member of our team for more information.



Alternatively, why not read our previous blog to discover the effects of sundowning?

6th April

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Our Care Homes in Suffolk: What to Expect When Your Loved One Moves into Care

Is your loved one moving into care?



Here at Wellbeing Care, we understand the difficulties you may be experiencing when coming to terms with your loved one moving away from home.



Here, we’re sharing what you can expect for your loved one as they move into one of our care homes in Suffolk:



Care Homes in Suffolk: Supporting the Transition Period



When your loved one first moves into care, there’s often an adjustment period as you both get used to your new ways of life. You’ll be learning to adapt to them being away, and they’ll be adjusting to a new environment.



This can often feel daunting and you may experience a mixture of conflicting emotions. This is completely normal, and once you both get used to them living in care, you’ll focus more on the positive aspects of the move.



We’ll support you and your loved one however we can during this transition. We often buddy our new residents up so they have a friend they can lean on in the first few weeks. We’ll encourage them to take part in activities to help them integrate into our community.



We’ll also ask that you help them pack important items, such as photographs and ornaments, that can help them feel more at home.



Care Homes in Suffolk: Your Loved One Will Receive Expert Care



When your loved one moves into one of our care homes in Suffolk, you can expect them to receive an unparalleled level of care.



Specialising in dementia care, we help your loved one live an independent life that’s within their capabilities.



We coordinate activities that will help to improve your loved one’s cognitive function, memory, motor skills, and comprehension. These activities range from baking and crafts to exercise classes and day trips. We try to encourage them to take part in the sessions to help improve their emotional and physical well-being.



We also provide exceptional care for those living with dementia. We take the time to learn different methods of communication which can help us to understand them and vice versa.



Here at Wellbeing Care, we also create bespoke care plans for each resident. This will reassure you that your loved one is receiving the very best person-centred care.



Care Homes in Suffolk: Understanding it’s For the Best



It can still feel unsettling to move your loved one into care, despite knowing they’re with capable and loving hands.



Your loved one can enjoy a fulfilling life at Wellbeing Care, with round-the-clock care and support should they need it. They’ll be in a safe and secure environment with like-minded individuals where they can have fun.



It’s not only your loved one who will benefit from moving into care. When you’re no longer their main carer, you can focus on spending more quality time with them and enjoying their company. This can help to improve your mental health and give you the freedom to focus on yourself a little bit more.



We have two care homes in Suffolk - The Dell and St George’s. If you’d like more information about either home, please contact a dedicated member of our team.



Alternatively, why not read our previous blog to find out more about person-centred care for dementia?

6th April

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Valentine’s Day Traditions | How Our Care Homes Celebrated

What are your Valentine’s Day traditions?



Here, we’re taking a look at what love means to different people, and sharing all the wonderful activities our residents took part in to celebrate Valentine’s Day:



Valentine’s Day Traditions and Values



Many people choose to spend quality time with their partner or spouse for their Valentine’s Day traditions, exchanging gifts and cards and enjoying a meal together.



Some people use the day to celebrate their friendships or let their family members know how much they love them, whilst others might use the day to indulge in self-care.



Here at Wellbeing Care, our residents used the time to celebrate all the love they’ve given and received, both in the past and at present. They reflected on how they used to celebrate when they were younger whilst making cards and decorating their craft pieces.



Valentine’s Day Traditions: Arts and Crafts



Many of our residents got creative this Valentine’s Day, making a variety of love-themed decorations and cards. They decorated small glass jars with glitter and gems to create beautiful, eye-catching candle holders.



They also used red, white and pink tissue paper to decorate paper hearts, which they then attached to a piece of string to hang up around the room. Whilst making Valentine’s cards, our residents used a variety of paints and stamps to create thoughtful keepsakes.



Craft activities are great for allowing our residents to express themselves, whilst also providing them with the opportunity to unwind and relax. The calming nature of arts and crafts can help to reduce stress and anxiety, whilst increasing feelings of happiness.



Creative activities also offer the chance for residents to spend quality time together and have meaningful conversations. Whilst getting creative, our residents reminisced about their Valentine’s Day traditions from days gone by, sharing their experiences and memories with one another.



Baking Valentine’s Day Treats



Residents across our homes always enjoy cooking and baking activities. These are great for improving cognitive skills and memory, as our residents have to measure ingredients, trust their judgement, and follow instructions carefully.



For Valentine’s Day, they baked a batch of themed cupcakes. They drizzled the cakes with white icing and then sprinkled on edible love heart confetti. The finished look was very effective, and our residents enjoyed tucking into them.



They also had lots of fun dipping strawberries into chocolate - which they thoroughly enjoyed alongside some delicious love heart shortbread and meringues made by our wonderful kitchen staff.



Valentine’s Day Traditions: Words of Advice



To finish off the celebrations, we asked our residents to share some words of wisdom about love. We had some beautiful answers, including, ‘always be there for each other,’ which were written down on paper hearts. We then threaded the hearts onto some string to make a decorative garland, which we hung up in our main lounge.



This was a lovely activity that allowed our residents to reflect on what love means to them.



If you’ve enjoyed our blog about our Valentine’s Day traditions, why not read our previous article on making the most of your retirement?



Alternatively, for more information about our care services, please contact a dedicated member of our team.

28th February

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The Benefits of Music Therapy | 6 Positive Ways Music Can Help Improve Your Mood

What are the benefits of music therapy?



Music therapy is a wonderful activity that our residents regularly enjoy. From singing to playing instruments, our music sessions never fail to create a warm, positive atmosphere throughout our home.



This week, we’re taking a look at the benefits of music therapy:





The Benefits of Music Therapy: It Makes You Feel Good



One of the benefits of music therapy is the increased production of dopamine - the hormone responsible for reducing feelings of stress and anxiety and elevating your mood.



Listening, singing along, playing or dancing to music can help to boost your mood. The stress-reducing effects of music therapy help to lower cortisol levels, inducing feelings of happiness and relaxation.



At Wellbeing Care, our residents regularly gather together for a fun music session full of laughs and positive energy.



Music Encourages You to Be More Active



Music encourages dancing - whether that's tapping in time with a beat or a waltz around the room.



Dancing and playing instruments can help to build muscle strength and improve balance, whilst also enhancing motor skills and coordination.



The Benefits of Music Therapy: Improved Memory Retention



Music can enhance areas of the brain associated with memory. Whether you remember lyrics or learn a dance routine, music provides stimulation to the brain and can help to form new neural pathways. You may also hear a song that's significant to you, bringing past memories to the forefront of your mind.



You may remember a particularly special time in your life, perhaps triggered by a certain song, and relive the emotions you felt at that time.



The Benefits of Music Therapy: Helping to Induce Sleep



Music can aid a better quality of sleep by encouraging relaxation and reducing stress. It can help you to switch off your thoughts, enabling you to fall asleep quicker and have a more restful night’s sleep.



Try listening to a gentle piece of music when you get into bed to reap the benefits of its calming effect. You could use an app, such as Calm, to play a relaxing, instrumental song on a timer. You can adjust the settings to ensure the music stops when you're asleep, and there is a wide range of styles you can choose from.



Music Therapy Encourages Self-Expression and Creativity



Here at Wellbeing Care, we understand that music is a personal activity and can be enjoyed in many different ways.



Music is a creative art and so it allows people the freedom to express themselves in whichever way they feel comfortable. You may wish, for example, to listen to relaxing classical music whilst in the bath, or an upbeat album to build your energy in preparation for a workout.



The Benefits of Music Therapy: Enhancing Fine Motor Skills



Playing an instrument is a great way to improve fine motor skills. Instruments that require intricate hand movements, such as guitar and piano playing, can help to exercise muscles you might not normally use.



At Wellbeing Care, we use collective rhythm as a guide to help our residents play music together - such as gently playing the drums or tapping a tambourine. This can help to improve memory and coordination.



We’re passionate about encouraging our residents to try a wide range of indoor and outdoor activities. If you’d like some inspiration, why not take a look at our gardening tips for seniors?



Alternatively, please contact a member of our team for more information about our care services.

17th February